Hypocrisy



And now the post-Opening Ceremonies of the 2016 Summer Olympics edition of 2016 Reasons–I actually did stop the previous post to get ready to watch the Opening Ceremonies. At this point, you know the drill about how I’m doing this to show all of the reasons to oppose Donald Trump for President of the United States and just about any other position he could ever want. He deserves nothing but shame for these things. 159. Calls undocumented people “illegals” and American-born children of undocumented people “anchor babies”, thus diminishing their humanity and allowing people to feel better about mistreating them. He also claims that no one was talking about immigration by undocumented people before his campaign, which is completely false. He’s called protesters “thugs” and accused them of being here illegally. When referring to himself by his full name, such a douche-tastic thing to do, he said he will strengthen the military and borders and get rid of “illegals”. He’s linked undocumented immigrants and and Syrians. He’s questioned the vaccination status of “illegals”, while defending white people who are anti-vaccination–a blatant for of racism and hypocrisy that has plagued the vaccine movement since its early days. His description of American-born children of immigrants as “anchor babies” is cruel and encourages racism against children of immigrants–something that is odd considering his mother is an immigrant and four of his five children have immigrant mothers. The statement was, of course, applauded by Fox and Friends. He has also called Ted Cruz an “anchor baby in Canada”. He claimed that “many” scholars say that these individuals aren’t covered by the 14th Amendment and vowed to continue calling people by the term. There is no question why he wants to use these slurs to talk about immigrants. He wants people to view them as enemies of the country; he wants them to beg the country to get rid of them. Despicable. 160. Claimed undocumented immigrants and women being raped were by criminals coming to the country “somebody’s doing the raping”. Donald Trump misread a Fusion article about migrant women being raped. He was called out on this online and by Don Lemon on CNN. He told Lemon: “Well if you look at the statistics of people coming, you look at the statistics on rape, on crime, on everything coming in illegally into this country it’s mind-boggling! If you go to Fusion, you will see a story: About 80% of the women coming in, you know who owns Fusion? Univision! Go to Fusion and pick up the stories on rape. It’s unbelievable when you look at what’s going on. So all I’m doing is telling the truth.” When Lemon tried correcting him, he responded with, “Well, somebody’s doing the raping, Don! I mean somebody’s doing it! Who’s doing the raping? Who’s doing the raping?” Completely. Out. Of. Touch. 161. Exploited death of Kate Steinle. Brad Steinle, Kate’s brother, accused Trump of sensationalizing his sister’s murder when Trump’s campaign began. Trump used Steinle as an example of why we shouldn’t allow undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States; he didn’t reach out to the family beforehand and the family was upset about it. 162. Calls his followers the Silent Majority. It’s a bit odd since they aren’t silent and who wants to co-opt things from Richard Nixon? 163. Wants to get rid of gun-free zones. In January, Trump declared that he would get rid of gun-free zones at schools & military bases on his first day if elected. He continued to speak in favor of ending gun-free zones in May, though many of his properties don’t allow guns on them. He also claimed in May that he thought he’d get rid of gun-free zones in schools “in some cases”, with only trained teachers and resource officers carrying them. So he’s opposed to them, if they don’t impact him personally and if he’s not asked to clarify how he really feels about them. Getting rid of gun free zones would not increase the safety of those places, and encouraging more guns could actually lead to an increase in violence. 164. “If you can’t get rich dealing with politicians, there’s something wrong with you.” If you’ve ever wondered if Donald Trump has engaged in corruption, there’s your answer. 165. Sees himself as a uniter. Unless Trump means that he’s united Republicans and Democrats against him, then he’s definitely not a “uniter” of anyone. But he’s claimed it multiple times, like in 2015, when he said, “I think that I would be a great uniter. I think that I would have great diplomatic skills. I think that I would be able to get along with people very well. I’ve had a great success in my life. I think the world would unite if I were the leader of the United States.” Yeah, no. 166. Opposes treating people with respect. At the Republican National Convention, he said, “We cannot afford to be so respectful anymore.” At Liberty University in January 2016, he said, “We’re going to protect Christianity, and I can say that. I don’t have to be respectful.” In 2015, he told Jake Tapper, “You can be respectful if you want, but are you trying to say we don’t have a problem?…Most Muslims, like most everything, I mean, these are fabulous people…But we certainly do have a problem, I mean, you have a problem throughout the world…It wasn’t people from Sweden that blew up the World Trade Center.” He told David Brody of The Brody File, “They’re tired of respectful stuff. I mean I could have said, ‘Oh absolutely not Bill, there’s no Muslim problem, everything is wonderful, just forget about the World Trade Center.’ But you have to speak the truth. We’re so respectful that this country is falling apart.” 167. Claims Clinton was worst Secretary of State ever. In 2015, he said Clinton “is easily the worst Secretary of State in the history of the country. She’s going to be beaten and I’m the one to […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #159-171



Sorry that I fell behind by a few days. I had some stuff come up in my family that took precedence. I have decided that splitting each list up into 21 items is a bit too anal of me. I’ll get as many done in a day as I can. That may mean huge lists some days and really small ones on other days. I have a feeling that if you’re looking for reasons to oppose Donald Trump, no list can be too big or too small.1 I’m also going to begin posting each reason on my Twitter account under #2016Reasons. I’ve already been posting each of these posts to that hashtag. 106. Trump said that you never see thin people drinking Diet Coke. Despite the fact that he drinks the soda, Trump enjoys fat-shaming people who drink the soda. I guess that it’s a case of do as I say, not as I do, also known as typical Donald Trump. 107. Donald Trump talks about women like they’re his property. You should know by now that I’m not joking when I say things like this, so yes, he really uses possessive language about women. Specifically, he said, “I think the only difference between me and the other candidates is that I’m more honest and my women are more beautiful.” And if you’re thinking, “well, at least it’s a compliment,” then I’m going to assume that you’re probably going to vote Republican anyway. People cannot be owned. Now, I know that Trump has a history of trying to get around that by “employing” people who are in forced servitude (slavery) to build things for him, but the statement stands. 108. He thinks he can brag about humility. When Lesley Stahl interviewed him for 60 Minutes after he announced that Pence would be his running mate, he said this about himself: “I think I’m much more humble than you would understand.” And it wasn’t the only time he felt the need to brag about how humble he is. He once even compared his humility to that of the Pope. Donald, Donald, Donald. Do you not understand how humility works? It’s not something that you can brag about. Well, obviously, you can brag about anything, but if you’re bragging about being humble, then you are not humble. Know why? It’s what the word means: Humility: a modest or low view of one’s own importance; humbleness. Bragging about humility is a bit like fat-shaming people for drinking Diet Coke while guzzling a tiny little bottle of Diet Coke on board a private plane. Yeah, I said it. 109. “The point is, you can never be too greedy.” I shouldn’t be surprised that Donald subscribes to the Gordon Gekko philosophy of wealth acquisition. Maybe, like many, he doesn’t understand that Gekko wasn’t the hero of those movies. He was the villain. Perhaps, he was inspired by the Ferengi in the Star Trek universe; failing to recognize that they too were meant to be antagonists. Or maybe it’s due to growing up in a wealthy family; he never learned that life isn’t about being the wealthiest person in the room or becoming the wealthiest person in the room. He values his bank balance more than he values lives. Is that the kind of person that you want running the United States? 110. Political events are about ratings for him. Whether talking about the debates or the Republican National Convention, Donald Trump obsessed over how many people were watching. I hate to break it to him, but a lot of people who watched those things aren’t even voting for him. At a certain point, watching Trump speak became more about either laughing at him or trying to determine just how out there the man is. But even if people were watching to root him on in his fight against the establishment–aka himself–believing that ratings are the most important part of the events proves how out of touch he is with the importance of the job he’s campaigning to have. Debates and conventions are not just job interviews, they’re part of national conversations where we all start determining where exactly this country should stand on a variety of important issues. Since Trump doesn’t even bother to share his plans for working on those issues, it’s clear that he doesn’t even get the most basic part about it. When he only speaks in incoherent soundbites, it’s easy to see how shallow the man and the campaign really are. 111. He’s opposed to marriage equality. Donald likes to paint himself as a pro-LGBTQ candidate, but he believes in “traditional” marriage. (Apparently, traditional marriage means a union of one man, three women, and a lot of divorce attorneys.) Electing Donald Trump could jeopardize the rights that so many people have fought so hard to win and could prevent future wins in other ongoing fights for equality in America. He has vowed to overturn the decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. 112. Patronized a woman claiming to be a 9/11 survivor. Trump called Alicia Watkins “sweetie” before giving her a “job interview” and saying he’d hire her because he had a gut feeling about her. Watkins told him that she was a 9/11 survivor and a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Watkins has since been described as having falsified her record and having violated federal laws against Stolen Valor by wearing a purple heart that she didn’t earn. Not only did he patronize her, he proved that his gut kinda sucks. 113. Threatened to “spill the beans” on Heidi Cruz. During the end of the Republican primaries, things between Ted Cruz and Donald Trump got a bit heated. In a move that Cruz still won’t forgive Trump for, Trump threatened Heidi on Twitter. He followed it up by retweeting an unflattering picture of Heidi–a move he actually regrets. 114. Called 9/11 “7/11”. During a rally, Donald Trump confused a huge national tragedy with the real life inspiration for the Kwik-E-Mart. For any American, that would be a big flub, but for someone who loves to brag about his patriotism […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #106-131


Hello, it’s me. Yes, I’m back on the last day of the Democratic National Convention to give the fifth list of reasons to oppose Donald Trump’s presidency and to oppose him in general. But if this list doesn’t convince you, maybe the previous four (1, 2, 3, 4) will. If that’s not enough, there will be another list of 21 reasons next time, and another the day after that, and the day after that…and so on until there are 2016 reasons to oppose Trump. 85. Trump supported Brexit. Donald Trump viewed Brexit as the British people taking control over their own country and borders, and putting their needs first, or so he suggested. Unfortunately, a man who somehow got a graduate degree from Wharton doesn’t seem to understand much about the economy. Apparently, business degrees don’t require that a person understand economics or global policy. Liam Fox, Trade Secretary for the United Kingdom, explained how woefully inaccurate Trump’s assumption that Brexit is all about focusing on Britain are, “In fact it was the reverse: In my view, it was about Britain becoming a much more outward-looking country.” He also saw Brexit as an opportunity to bilk money out of his supporters. Donald can’t ever miss an opportunity to do a little song and dance for a check from unsuspecting, innocent people. Sad. 86. …But he didn’t know how Scotland had voted in the EU Referendum. How does a man who was raised by a Scottish immigrant not know that one should never confuse the will of the English with the will of the Scottish? Scotland, along with Northern Ireland, voted to remain in the European Union, a decision that could dissolve the United part of the United Kingdom. It would officially change the way that Scotland and England have functioned for over four hundred years. If ever there was proof that total assimilation within a culture was a bad idea, it would be Donald Trump’s inept understanding of how Scotland fits in to the Brexit situation and into the United Kingdom in general. How do people judge this man to be competent enough to vote for? 87. Donald Trump claims that he broke the glass ceiling for women all by himself. I’ll repeat. Donald Trump claims that he broke the glass ceiling for women all by himself. He told Bill O’Reilly, noted White House slavery enthusiast, “Number one, I have great respect for women. I was the one that really broke the glass ceiling on behalf of women, more than anybody in the construction industry.” He also told O’Reilly, “My relationship I think is going to end up being very good with women.” I don’t even know where to begin. Taking credit for breaking the glass ceiling? Even if he’s succeeded in helping women in one industry, it is not his place to say that he broke the glass ceiling. I guess if he was asked who gave women the right to vote, he’d claim he wrote the 19th Amendment and got it ratified on his own. I bet he’d even claim he was up in Seneca Falls. He might as well. He is taking credit for the achievement of women and of the hardwork put into giving full-fledged equal opportunities and rights to people regardless of sex or gender, even though he fails to pay women the same as men on his campaign. He is asserting his privilege to deny women the ability to say that they earned their position and that they fought for it. To quote the great philosopher and ethicist Taylor Swift, “I want to say to all the young women out there, there will be people along the way who will try to undercut your success, or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame. But if you just focus on the work…you will look around and you will know that it was you and the people who love you that put you there. That will be the greatest moment.” 88. Trump called pregnancies of employees an inconvenience for business. Yes, he actually said, “a wonderful thing for the woman, it’s a wonderful thing for the husband, it’s certainly an inconvenience for a business. And whether people want to say that or not, the fact is it is an inconvenience for a person that is running a business” on video. So there’s proof that he feels this way. To summarize: the pro-life party is now being represented by a man who once called pregnancy an inconvience for business; and he said this after he began identifying as pro-life. 89. Trump has called Elizabeth Warren ineffective. To Trump, ineffective means that Elizabeth Warren pisses him off and doesn’t put up with his bullshit. He’s said she is the least productive Senator, that she gets nothing done, that she is weak. Elizabeth Warren should channel Mean Girls character Regina George and ask Donald, “Why are you so obsessed with me?” Because, clearly, he is. 90. Donald Trump insulted Warren by saying she has a big mouth. Apparently, Trump thinks that women who stand up to his childish behavior are worthy of scorn and deserve to be silenced for it. He’s even said that he wants to shut her up. Way to go, GOP! You’ve nominated a man wanting to silence women. Classy stuff, if you’re in the 1950’s. 91. Trump accused Hillary of only being popular because of the “woman card” and not for any other reason. In yet another example of Trump being an misogynist, he decided that Hillary was somehow getting more support because she’s a woman. He said, in a news conference at Trump Tower in April, “Frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she’d get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she’s got going is the woman’s card. And the beautiful thing is, women don’t like her.” He claims a former United States Senator and Secretary of State is unqualified. You know, unlike a “businessman” who has never […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #85-105



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Sometimes in life I feel the urge to rant about things that bother me and, guess what, Trump bothers me. A lot. So I decided since it’s the 2016 election that I would come up with 2016 reasons not to vote for Trump. Of course I realize this may not convince people to not vote for him, but it will allow me to express reasons he should never be the President of the United States. I know 2016 is a lot of reasons to come up with, but I believe I can come up with them. I will try to remember to include links to information backing up reason so that you will see that this isn’t just me making baseless accusations. There will be 99 posts of 21 reasons each over the next 99 or so days. This will give enough time before the election to get all 2016 reasons out.1 1. Trump is a liar.  As of July 23, 2016, only 29% of statements made by Donald Trump are considered Half True—15%, Mostly True–10%, or True–4% by Politifact. Even during his RNC convention speech, Trump couldn’t avoid lying.2 The Washington Post has accused him of being “pathologically dishonest“; the National Review labeled him the “post-truth candidate“. 2. Trump was accused of raping his first wife, Ivana Trump. During a deposition for their divorce, Ivana described a sexual assault perpetrated by Donald against her in 1989. When the rape was discussed in a 2015 article on The Daily Beast, Michael Cohen, special counsel at The Trump Organization said: “You’re talking about the frontrunner for the GOP, presidential candidate, as well as a private individual who never raped anybody. And, of course, understand that by the very definition, you can’t rape your spouse…It is true…You cannot rape your spouse. And there’s very clear case law.”3 3. Trump was accused of attempting to rape Jill Harth. In 1997, Harth filed a suit against Trump alleging that he sexually assaulted her in 1993. Harth also accused Trump of repeated, unwanted sexual advances. She claims he groped her under the table at a restaurant and he pushed her up against the wall of his daughter’s bedroom and groped her again. The lawsuit was settled, though Trump denied the allegations. 4. Trump was accused of raping a thirteen-year old girl. The girl, publicly refered to as Katie Johnson, filed a lawsuit accusing Trump and Jeffrey Epstein of having solicited sex from her at sex parties at their homes in Manhattan in 1994. She claims Trump “took her virginity in 1994 when she was only 13 and being held by Epstein as a slave.” She said they threatened her family and her with harm if she didn’t comply. The claims were corroberated by a person referred to as Tiffany Doe. 5. Trump was implicated in the rape and disappearance of a twelve-year old girl. Katie Johnson’s lawsuit alleges that she was forced to participate in sex acts with a girl referred to as Maria Doe for the enjoyment of Donald Trump. Johnson claimed that Trump told her she “shouldn’t ever say anything if I didn’t want to disappear like Maria, a 12-year-old female that was forced to be involved in the third incident with Defendant Trump and that I had not seen since that third incident, and that he was capable of having my whole family killed.” These claims were also corroberated by Tiffany Doe. 6. Donald Trump is a birther. Remember when Trump decided to accuse Obama of not being born in Hawaii, meaning he couldn’t be the American president? Yeah, it was quite the story. And guess what? He still identifies as one, despite evidence that Obama was born in the country.4 Birtherism is blatant xenophobia, which has become Trump’s favorite -phobia. Well, aside from Islamophobia. And homophobia.  7. In his campaign announcement speech, he accused Mexico of sending rapists and drug dealers. Supporters of Trump like to point out that Trump followed that up with the statement that “some, I assume, are good people“—which doesn’t make it any better. It’s like telling someone that the bowl of strawberries they handed you has rotten berries in it, but that some aren’t actually rotten. It’s a xenophobic, good-luck-guessing-who-is-bad statement. It’s fear-mongering. Trump supporters really ate those rotten berries up. And guess what? It’s pretty much bullshit. 8. Trump used slave labor in Dubai. Slave labor was used to build Trump International Golf Course in Dubai. This was supposed to be the “greatest golf course in the world” according to the more-humble-than-you-know Trump. Workers made less than $200 a month and lived in squalorous conditions. 9. Trump has been accused of sexual harassment and humiliation by former employees. This year, Elizabeth Davidson filed a complaint with the Davenport Civil Rights Commission over remarks made by Trump while she was working for his campaign in Iowa. He has been accused by multiple women of mocking or degrading women working for him, using dismissive and sexist language to refer to them. 10. Trump has stated that he is attracted to his daughter, Ivanka Trump. Multiple times. His first caveat with his incestuous attraction is that he’s married, not that she’s his daughter. He joked about how she’s she could be in Playboy and that he could date her.  He only asserts that he’s her father and couldn’t date her as a side note. 11. Trump sexualized Tiffany as an infant. In an interview, Trump stated he’d like his then one-year olds daughter Tiffany to inherit her mom’s breasts. 12. Trump is hypocritical on Clinton’s vs. Pence’s support of the Iraq War. In last week’s 60 Minutes, Trump defended Pence voting for the Iraq War, while simultaneously bashing Hillary Clinton for her vote. Pence is, according to Trump, entitled to make mistakes. Hypocrisy, Party of Don. 13. Trump is hypocritical over receiving money/favors from Saudi Arabia. In another case of “do as I say, not as I do”, Trump likes to imply that Hillary has received money from Saudi Arabia either personally or for her […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump — Reasons #1-21


Last night, a couple of ladies on Twitter had a whine-fest over my blocking them after I favorited and retweeted these: @LibertyBelleCJL anti-gun control/pro death penalty nut who loves fetuses.. — LaurelMd (@PanchoPanucci) September 24, 2015 @CaseyParksIt @LibertyBelleCJL 'protecting life' with anti-gun control, pro death penalty, pro war?..get a clue.. — LaurelMd (@PanchoPanucci) September 24, 2015 They thought that I was the friend of PanchoPanucci, but I simply found those tweets after searching through the #DefundPP hashtag. I favorited and retweeted them because I agreed that there is a good deal of hypocrisy within that movement. Ladies, I'm not her friend. But if you want to read my tweets regarding #defundpp I'll unblock you. https://t.co/2VZX5BBvNR — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 You can find out what I REALLY think of you. https://t.co/2VZX5BBvNR — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 @_wintergirl93 @LibertyBelleCJL Go ahead, girls. I had you blocked before even reading those tweets. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 When they found out that I had them blocked before even finding their tweets, they had to throw a fit. How could anyone ever want to block them? They’re just too perfect for that. Clearly, I’m doing something awful to decide that I don’t want to interact with people who I think will only cause drama and spread hate. I figure that they were upset because they feel that they have a right to be heard by every single person on earth. Just because you have the right to share your beliefs and opinions with the world doesn’t mean that the world will listen to you. Why does it even matter who I am? Yes, I prematurely block people. Most are individuals who follow racists. https://t.co/7Hkv3hACCo — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Actually I'm very confident in my position. Why should I not block people who follow bigots? Or those who name call? https://t.co/rMEfYhdVSA — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 What? You WOULDN'T block people who follow actual Neo-Nazis, Klan members, & people preaching white supremacy? https://t.co/GNpD2JLpTC — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 @_wintergirl93 Look at accounts under the various hashtags for white supremacy. If you see someone you follow, that's why you were blocked. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 They even had to have their friends come to the rescue.1 It was not at all surprising. Nah, you can just check those hashtags. I'm sure you'll find 'em. https://t.co/MdCgCagLeG — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 And, of course, supporting Planned Parenthood means I don’t understand what racism actually is, or that a lot of old companies and organizations had ties to various racist groups and regimes. Guess what, folks! Margaret Sanger was not the only racist alive in the 20th Century. There were a lot of them and there were some who had a direct hand in actual atrocities. How do you feel about Volkswagen, Porsche, Hugo Boss, Bayer, IBM, Daimler, Kellogg & BASF? https://t.co/bxrGrVicpW — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 That tweet seemed to scare most of them off, but I basically warned off any future comments with: Dear #DefundPP, Every time you take an Aspirin made by Bayer & every time you hear about Sarin gas, remember this: http://t.co/eRjzOJk7qJ — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 I've heard enough about how Margaret Sanger was an eugenicist & how people who support #PlannedParenthood now are responsible for that. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 If you bring up Sanger, I may bring up some companies or individuals that I'm sure you've supported that have ties to Nazis & other racists. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 I hope that maybe they’ll get the message, but I really doubt it. They were actually encouraging their friends to do this. ↩

#DefundPP is Full of Hypocrisy



Janet Morris, I liked this movie a lot. I ordered a copy of it here. Every other reviewer liked the movie. I think your very critical and nasty review says more about you than about the movie. And so it begins…again. You would think that my review was the single most vicious review in the history of the world. You would think that I encouraged people to sacrifice babies or virgins or something. Or that I declared myself to be a servant of the Antichrist, especially since I was pretty much accused of doing just that at one point. What I did do was give a bad miniseries a one star-rating and gave it this review: Like many other movies and miniseries about this topic, this work is horrifically bad. It was poorly written, acted, and produced. It is almost laughable how awful this thing is. This is worse than some of the bad science fiction movies that I watch for kicks. It sticks to a convoluted interpretation of the Christian apocalypse that opportunists like Kirk Cameron, Jerry B. Jenkins, and Tim LaHaye have used to line their pockets for years, but the overused plot not even the worst aspect of this thing. The shaky camera style is reminiscent of The Blair Witch Project, which fits well with the other poorly executed parts of the miniseries. If you are prone to vertigo, migraines, seizures, or motion sickness, especially if these have been triggered in the past by past movies or television shows, you might want to avoid this for health reasons. If not, just avoid it for quality reasons. It’s not entertaining enough to justify wasting so much time on it. People focus so heavily on the first paragraph that they get a bit wonky and think I’m some evil heathen that wants them to join a God-hating cult.1 They don’t realize that the second paragraph is exclusively about the production value or that I say that it reminds me of a secular horror film that I hated. They don’t realize that I love religious studies, even if I’m not always good with religion itself. They don’t realize that I know the difference between the different apocalypse stories and that this one does actually fall in line with that opportunism. They also don’t realize that I wanted to watch the miniseries and I wanted to like it. But I didn’t. And when I didn’t, I felt it was okay to complain about it. Clearly, I was wrong. The first time I got flack over it was the day after I posted the review. It seemed so coincidental that the person would post a five-star review the day after my review went live, especially since it said: Finally, a Christian based docudrama that did not have any negative political overtones. Do not fall for the “anti-Christian” reviews by others. My review of the History Channel miniseries Revelations: The End of Days was the only one until this one posted. Over a month after I posted my review, I got around a dozen comments from someone using “100% Christian” as their username. All the little things that I’ve said I’ve been accused of came from them. I reported their comments to Amazon and they actually deleted them. The person then commented on a comment I’d made2 on the second review saying, “If you aren’t 100% for Christ — then you’re 100% for satan. There is no middle ground.” Five days later, a different user said, in response to the same comment: “Janet Morris: The criticism against your review is valid, since you posted comments that were not relevant. Your comments about Tim LaHaye, et. al. lining their pockets had nothing to do with the movie and is not helpful in determining whether this is worth buying/watching or not.” I responded:3 Respectfully, I disagree with everything you’re saying, Mr. Ruhf. I suggest that you look at professional reviews of works like Vampire Academy, The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, Twilight, and Fifty Shades of Grey. They’re compared by professionals to other works. They’re accused of trying to manipulate fan bases of similar works, as are so many other works. It is not uncommon or wrong to point out that trends in genres are used to make money off of fans of those genres, especially when the result is considered of particularly low-quality. Now, as for what IS wrong, it is wrong to take a negative review and turn it into a way to personally attack the reviewer. The criticism that you say is valid involved not only this particular reviewer creating a review for this product for the purpose of calling me anti-Christian, but for the other commenter on this review to (before creating their comment on this review) create eleven comments on my review calling me a cultist and Satanist, and comparing me and my review to ISIS. Your calling sort of behavior valid criticism is really quite appalling. I do appreciate your down-voting of my review and your time spent on telling me the errors of my ways. Then I didn’t hear anything for while. In the mean time there have been 5 other five-star reviews4 and one four-star. The four-star is the most critical of them. But most of the others? Not at all. In fact, most of the others are barely long enough to be considered blurbs. It seems like someone is faking reviews for this miniseries. It’s possible that there were a lot of people who enjoyed it, but the timing is all very strange. In the meantime, I wrote this to respond to “Amazon Customer” about their complaints of my “critical and nasty review”: Then write your own review and leave me alone. People are allowed to dislike movies. People are allowed to be critical and my criticism was valid. And, for the record, I’ve received quite a lot of hate (dozens of comments that Amazon had to delete because they were *that* bad) from fans of […]

All the Interesting People Are Missing


It takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to our enemies, but just as much to stand up to our friends. The easiest thing to do when you disagree with ideas promoted by LDS Church members and by the church itself is to leave. It’s what I did. There were a lot of reasons that I went inactive within the church, but one was that I found myself feeling more and more uncomfortable with what was being promoted. I admire Kate Kelly and John Dehlin for feeling able to stand up to the church and continue to go there while being threatened with disciplinary actions, including excommunication. I don’t think I will be going back any time soon. There are certain things that happened while I was active that I never felt comfortable with, as well as things that happened before I was a member that made me feel funny. Right after my mom joined, some members tried to pressure her into getting me to join. Because she didn’t, she faced some ostracism. When Stephanie was baptized, I wore a dress that may have been a little low-cut. I was 16 and a non-member. It didn’t show anything off, but there were comments about it. When I was doing my interview with a missionary and had to answer questions to determine my readiness, some of the questions included my chastity and if I’d had an abortion or helped someone else to get one. I hadn’t had sex and I decided that being adamantly pro-choice didn’t count toward helping someone get an abortion, but the questions made me feel funny. I was told within weeks of joining that I was basically bastard-born because my parents weren’t sealed in the temple. They were married. My mom converted to the church when I was about 10. My dad never did. According to the church, my birth is illegitimate. At an Institute lesson, within weeks of my joining, we were taught that any person who questions the church’s teachings in any way is like gangrene. They’re a gangrenous limb that can be cut off. It made me feel like I had no way of learning about the church. This man also said people who watch horror films are more touched by “the Adversary”, aka Satan; he also said that women’s positions as mothers made them equal to men in their roles as Priesthood holders. Another of his fun teachings, that is actually church doctrine, is that if you have to choose between paying for your medicine or groceries and paying your monthly tithing, you should always pick tithing because Heavenly Father will always provide for you if you do this. Technically, if you pay the tithing, the Church is supposed to help you get by with aid programs. They don’t always do that. And if they do help, it isn’t without even more strings. On the way to a regional (though not our region) YSA conference, shortly after crossing into Tennessee, the co-rep for the Stake’s YSA started calling Barack Obama “Korihor”–aka a Mormon anti-christ.1 The other people in the car agreed with her. Because of her position of power and my tendency in non-internet social situations to be extremely quiet, I just sat and listened to them. I was told that if I really believed in God and in the Church that my mental and physical health problems would be miraculously cured. When friends were talking about homosexuality being unnatural, I said that they were wrong. I brought up that I had 1 guinea pig that had been gay and 1 that had been bisexual, so I knew that homosexual behavior was a natural thing. I was told that was inappropriate to talk about. It seemed odd that it was okay to talk about it being unnatural, but it was horrifying for me to say it was normal. At that same conversation, these two friends were talking about the upcoming election. This was at Halloween 2008. They were talking about how one’s sister had told her class that she supported McCain and had heard little support for Obama. They were talking about how it was nice that so many people in the area were Republicans. They didn’t even know any Democrats. This was when I told them that I was actually a Democrat. They said that wasn’t popular in the church and I should consider changing parties. At the dance, the same member2 who had called Obama “Korihor” was in a costume that seemed to include blackface. She said it wasn’t, but it was pretty clear that she had blackened her face and taken on a costume of an underprivileged person so she could promote some pretty anti-black feelings. I contemplated talking to someone about her doing this at a church dance, but I knew that with the conservative leanings of local Mormons that I might be the one who would be disciplined for not respecting the leader of the group I was under.3 At 2 Break the Fast meals for the Ward’s YSA, there was some political discussion going on. Yet again when I just mentioned supporting another party, the discussion was shifted without any acknowledgement that I said anything. At a combined session of Relief Society and Priesthood, which rarely happens, the wife of the then First Counselor of the Church went on a little rant about how we needed to be especially good about building up our Food Storage because Obama had been elected. After giving a lesson on tolerance during FHE for the group’s YSA, I was unfriended by blackface girl. I also saw that she (and other YSA people) had “Facebook flair” that said gingers had no souls. Though I knew the reference was a South Park one, it felt a little personal. On Internet postings by Ward and Stake members in 2008 and 2012, people threatened to leave the country or suggested that the world was going to end because Obama was elected. Anytime he’s […]

Different Types of Courage



2
There is a difference between pointing out to someone that they have a weight issue and “calling” them fat. When it is used as an insult, it’s meant to degrade and objectify the person. It’s meant to tell them that they are worthless because that’s how media portrays overweight/obese people. I’m not completely sure how it works within the context of a partnered relationship, but calling someone fat is definitely a form of verbal and psychological abuse. Interestingly, there is a correlation of various types of abuse in childhood and a person’s likelihood of one day being an overweight or obese adult. So, it may be considered aggressive to call an adult fat because it could potentially trigger that person to think about issues that they had as a child and abuse that they went through at that time. I base that on my personal experiences of being called fat as an adult triggering memories of childhood abuse that was related to my weight and that actually caused the weight. Last night, I posted that comment as a response to someone saying, “How is telling someone they are fat abusive? Some people are fat. That’s how they’re bodies are. Is it that calling them fat is abusive or is it making their perceived fatness into an insult that is abusive? Because telling me I’m fat is like telling me I’m crude. Neither may be meant as a compliment, but both are correct.” I thought I had done a decent job with my response. I didn’t see how anyone could find it offensive, but apparently I was wrong and now my inbox is paying for my mistake. First, from the person I initially responded to: “Janet, I do not have a “weight issue”. Fuck that shit. You may have an issue with my weight, but I’m just fat. Do not try to tell me that the way I am is an insult or that likening other people to me is abuse. OK? That’d be great.” And, then, the ones where people obsessed on the first line and disregarded everything else. But why would you point that out to anyone? It’s not like they don’t know! It’s not like it’s any of your fucking business! So you want to go around, pointing out the obvious to someone, that they have failed to live up to modern standards of the appropriate size, that people are judging them for that every day, and you think that’s not rude? On what fucking planet? The only difference I can see is that one method is deemed* “politer” than the other. But telling someone either way is fucking rude. *by idiots who think that the exact content of the message is important.” “There’s also (and I’m prolly repeating at least one person, but wottheheck) the matter that being fat is not automatically an issue. Fat doesn’t equal unhealthy, but even if it did, it’s still rude and stupid to bring the matter up with someone, especially a stranger. “No, they’re pretty much the same thing, except that the former is more passive-aggressive. I mean, why would you tell someone that? They know what they weigh. If you’re worried abou their health, well, diets don’t work in the long term. And being fat is much much less of a health issue than most people think. It’s a bit like walking up to someone with a mole on their cheek and saying, “hey you’ve git a mole on your cheek!” It serves no purpose except to make that person feel more self-conscious. And studies have shown that making people self-conscious about their weight is more likely to lead to weight gain than weight loss.” “I can’t imagine a situation in which it would be helpful or appropriate for anyone (other than a person’s medical advisers) to make uninvited comments on a person’s weight.” “Re: People pointing out how much others weigh: I fucking hate that. I avoid going out to meet relatives and certain acquaintances if I even have the slightest suspicion that I’ve put on weight since the last time we met. I’m unfortunate enough to know way too many people who just love pointing out that I’ve gained some weight. Most of all I hate meeting SO’s mother, who takes these really annoying shots at tapping at my belly and smiling mockingly. Who does that? Do people like this really think I haven’t noticed I’ve gained weight? Do they seriously think being mocked for it is going to inspire me to lose weight? If running 10-16 km a day and eating around 1,000 calories less than what I need in a day isn’t making me lose fat, then I don’t know what to tell you. Not that they’d believe all this, of course, since being overweight is just a sign of being lazy and loving to eat and shitfuckshitfuckargh (And no, I’m not saying men are generally shamed for being fat. I guess I just have fucking annoying people around me and a tendency to take things far too personally.)” “So, um, why do we need to point out to people that they have “a weight issue”? People presumably know roughly what their own weight and/or size is, given that they have to, you know, buy clothes for themselves and stuff. Are you under the impression that you are giving them new and potentially revelatory information when you oh so kindly inform them that they are not slim? I’m just not seeing how being passive-aggressive about it makes it any nicer, or why people are doing it in the first place.” ““Oh, hey! Did you know that you’re in a wheel chair? Is it because you can’t walk, or are you just THAT LAZY?” STFU -_-;” ““You are short! Like, really short!” “I had noticed, yeah.” “Well, have you considered getting taller? I hear they can do marvelous things now by breaking the bones in your legs and putting bits of metal in.”” So, I tried to […]

I’ll Take Missing the Point for $200, Alex


A mental illness is a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life. Serious mental illnesses include major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder. The good news about mental illness is that recovery is possible. Mental illnesses can affect persons of any age, race, religion or income. Mental illnesses are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character or poor upbringing. Mental illnesses are treatable. Most people diagnosed with a serious mental illness can experience relief from their symptoms by actively participating in an individual treatment plan.1 I’m mentally ill. This isn’t really news. I’ve never been ashamed of being mentally ill. I’ve never felt the need to say that I am embarrassed by what’s wrong with me. I’ve been open about my experiences. I’ve made a fool of myself a few times because of my mental health issues. I don’t feel that my issues are all that makes me me. Even though they impact most aspects of my life, they aren’t all that there is to me. I know other people don’t feel this way. Meet one of these people: At first I thought that I was misunderstanding Paul’s response to Marci on the issue of gun control. He brought up mental illness as part of his argument against gun control. He was very big on his interpretation of the Second Amendment2 and how his right to bear arms was somehow the most important thing in the world. He wasn’t so big on other Amendments and how they might impact other people. For example, the Eighth Amendment3 or the Sixth Amendment4 First, it was a Twitter discussion. Then, Paul deleted the tweets and decided to blog about it instead, so here are the responses I have to what he has said: Los Angeles, CA—There is little doubt that every mass shooter in the USA suffered from severe mental illness, usually schizophrenia. Most or all have rejected taking anti-psychotic medication and accordingly they went on deadly rampages. Nope. Not true. The Washington Post actually addresses this myth in a recent article by Dr. Dewey G. Cornell, a forensic clinical psychology.5 And it’s time that we stop blaming every single one on the mentally ill, okay? We used to put these people in mental hospitals that were more tolerable and comfortable than our jails. After our medical community determined that wonder drugs were more humane that hospitalization they convinced government officials to close the asylums. Now the same people are simply sitting in jails and prisons without treatment. The effort to be more humane has backfired. The solution offered against violence by the insane is to eliminate gun rights for the sane and law-abiding. They seem to forget that the insane use knives, clubs or brute force to murder. They can’t seem to understand that before the Oklahoma Bombing and 9/11 attack on America that the most significant mass murder was committed with a single gallon of gasoline at the Happyland Social Club taking nearly 100 lives. Bringing up those events within the context of a discussion on mass murder has me wondering what all we’re considering to be mass murder. Oklahoma City was a bombing committed by an American anti-government, right-wing extremist. The events of 9/11 were 20 non-Americans using planes as weapons because a terrorist group didn’t like American foreign policy. The Happy Land fire was an arson committed by the jealous ex-boyfriend of one employee that ended up killing 87 people because the business blocked the fire exits. She survived the fire. We have two acts of terrorism with political motivations and the act of a guy who thought he could get revenge on his ex and the place she worked. Are we going to include other acts of terror? Perhaps since 9/11 led to one war directly and another indirectly, we should include things that happen within wars. Perhaps we should also include things that lead to wars. Should we include acts of terror against other countries that were perpetrated here? Should we include other anti-government acts, or do the reverse and show acts of violence perpetrated by people on behalf of the government that ended in the deaths of other people? Since we’re talking about a fire started by a jealous ex-lover, do we include all acts where an ex kills or attempts to kill someone because that ex feels jilted in some way? Do we include school shootings? Do we include workplace violence? Do we include spree killers? Do we include family annihilators? Do we include serial murders? Do we include genocidal actions towards the indigenous population of America? Are we going to talk about all mass killings or just the 1-in-6 that are known by the public?6 Or that 25% of mass killings that don’t involve strangers, gangs, or robberies are due to a breakup.7 Or how 57% of victims knew the attacker, even if they weren’t that attacker’s initial target.8 Or how some are from being fired9 or being evicted10. Now, I don’t know Paul’s experiences in the mental hospitals of old or the jails that exist, but from what I know, they were not “more tolerable and comfortable” than the jails and prisons in this country. I’m guessing that he didn’t realize that compulsory sterilization laws impacted people in institutions for criminals and ones for the mentally ill, as well as outsiders, the poor and minorities. The eugenics law craze started in 1907 in Indiana and spread to 30 other states. People who were seen as defective underwent sterilization procedures. I’m guessing he also was unaware that between 1936 and the late 1950s, an estimated 50,000 lobotomies were performed in the United States. Between 1953 and 1957, in Athens County, Ohio, […]

Pot Meet Kettle