History


Hello, it’s me. Yes, I’m back on the last day of the Democratic National Convention to give the fifth list of reasons to oppose Donald Trump’s presidency and to oppose him in general. But if this list doesn’t convince you, maybe the previous four (1, 2, 3, 4) will. If that’s not enough, there will be another list of 21 reasons next time, and another the day after that, and the day after that…and so on until there are 2016 reasons to oppose Trump. 85. Trump supported Brexit. Donald Trump viewed Brexit as the British people taking control over their own country and borders, and putting their needs first, or so he suggested. Unfortunately, a man who somehow got a graduate degree from Wharton doesn’t seem to understand much about the economy. Apparently, business degrees don’t require that a person understand economics or global policy. Liam Fox, Trade Secretary for the United Kingdom, explained how woefully inaccurate Trump’s assumption that Brexit is all about focusing on Britain are, “In fact it was the reverse: In my view, it was about Britain becoming a much more outward-looking country.” He also saw Brexit as an opportunity to bilk money out of his supporters. Donald can’t ever miss an opportunity to do a little song and dance for a check from unsuspecting, innocent people. Sad. 86. …But he didn’t know how Scotland had voted in the EU Referendum. How does a man who was raised by a Scottish immigrant not know that one should never confuse the will of the English with the will of the Scottish? Scotland, along with Northern Ireland, voted to remain in the European Union, a decision that could dissolve the United part of the United Kingdom. It would officially change the way that Scotland and England have functioned for over four hundred years. If ever there was proof that total assimilation within a culture was a bad idea, it would be Donald Trump’s inept understanding of how Scotland fits in to the Brexit situation and into the United Kingdom in general. How do people judge this man to be competent enough to vote for? 87. Donald Trump claims that he broke the glass ceiling for women all by himself. I’ll repeat. Donald Trump claims that he broke the glass ceiling for women all by himself. He told Bill O’Reilly, noted White House slavery enthusiast, “Number one, I have great respect for women. I was the one that really broke the glass ceiling on behalf of women, more than anybody in the construction industry.” He also told O’Reilly, “My relationship I think is going to end up being very good with women.” I don’t even know where to begin. Taking credit for breaking the glass ceiling? Even if he’s succeeded in helping women in one industry, it is not his place to say that he broke the glass ceiling. I guess if he was asked who gave women the right to vote, he’d claim he wrote the 19th Amendment and got it ratified on his own. I bet he’d even claim he was up in Seneca Falls. He might as well. He is taking credit for the achievement of women and of the hardwork put into giving full-fledged equal opportunities and rights to people regardless of sex or gender, even though he fails to pay women the same as men on his campaign. He is asserting his privilege to deny women the ability to say that they earned their position and that they fought for it. To quote the great philosopher and ethicist Taylor Swift, “I want to say to all the young women out there, there will be people along the way who will try to undercut your success, or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame. But if you just focus on the work…you will look around and you will know that it was you and the people who love you that put you there. That will be the greatest moment.” 88. Trump called pregnancies of employees an inconvenience for business. Yes, he actually said, “a wonderful thing for the woman, it’s a wonderful thing for the husband, it’s certainly an inconvenience for a business. And whether people want to say that or not, the fact is it is an inconvenience for a person that is running a business” on video. So there’s proof that he feels this way. To summarize: the pro-life party is now being represented by a man who once called pregnancy an inconvience for business; and he said this after he began identifying as pro-life. 89. Trump has called Elizabeth Warren ineffective. To Trump, ineffective means that Elizabeth Warren pisses him off and doesn’t put up with his bullshit. He’s said she is the least productive Senator, that she gets nothing done, that she is weak. Elizabeth Warren should channel Mean Girls character Regina George and ask Donald, “Why are you so obsessed with me?” Because, clearly, he is. 90. Donald Trump insulted Warren by saying she has a big mouth. Apparently, Trump thinks that women who stand up to his childish behavior are worthy of scorn and deserve to be silenced for it. He’s even said that he wants to shut her up. Way to go, GOP! You’ve nominated a man wanting to silence women. Classy stuff, if you’re in the 1950’s. 91. Trump accused Hillary of only being popular because of the “woman card” and not for any other reason. In yet another example of Trump being an misogynist, he decided that Hillary was somehow getting more support because she’s a woman. He said, in a news conference at Trump Tower in April, “Frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she’d get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she’s got going is the woman’s card. And the beautiful thing is, women don’t like her.” He claims a former United States Senator and Secretary of State is unqualified. You know, unlike a “businessman” who has never […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #85-105


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Another day, another detailed list of why Trump should not be President. And guess what else happens today? The Democratic National Convention starts. Yay! If you’re surprised that I’m a Democrat, you’re obviously new here. And if you’re new here, then you don’t realize that I’m posting 21 reasons every day for 99 days to show why Donald Trump should never be the President of the United States. I’m not trying to push any of the other candidates in these posts, even if I do prefer one party to all the others. Now that I’ve gotten through with the disclaimer-esque statement, let’s get on to the discussion of Trump’s failings. Let’s see, we left off with Donald Trump allowing a racist gambler to dictate how he ran his casino, so let’s go to a similar claim about Mr. Trump and his casinos for number 43. 43. When Donald and Ivana would go to the casino, the bosses would order all black employees off the floor. For a man who vehemently denies racism, he’s done a lot of racist stuff. No one knows if it was just the bosses at his Atlantic City properties who made the order or if it was an order from the boss-man himself, but Kip Brown, a former employee, told The New Yorker about the “policy” last summer. 44. Donald Trump called black people lazy and said he only wants Jewish people counting his money. In Trumped!: The Inside Story of the Real Donald Trump — His Cunning Rise and Spectacular Fall by John O’Donnell, one-time president of the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, says that Trump once told him: “Yeah, I never liked the guy. I don’t think he knows what the fuck he’s doing. My accountants up in New York are always complaining about him. He’s not responsive. And isn’t it funny, I’ve got black accountants at Trump Castle and at Trump Plaza. Black guys counting my money! I hate it. The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day. Those are the kind of people I want counting my money. Nobody else.” Trump continued with, “Besides that, I’ve got to tell you something else. I think that the guy is lazy. And it’s probably not his fault because laziness is a trait in blacks. It really is, I believe that. It’s not anything they can control…Don’t you agree?” When interviewed by Mark Bowden for Playboy magazine in 1997, Trump responded that the account was probably true; but in 2016, he said that it was fiction. Are you starting to get the feeling that his claims of not being racist are a little disingenuous? 45. Trump was sued for lack of diverse employees in 1996 at a riverboat casino. Trump was sued by 20 African Americans in Indiana for failing to hire mostly minority workers for a Lake Michigan riverboat casino. Trump had promised that 70% of his workforce at the floating casino would be made of members of the minority community and 52% would be women. The lawsuit also alleged that he hasn’t honored commitments to steer contracts to minority-owned businesses in Gary. 46. Donald Trump is supported by Vojislav Šešelj. Admittedly, in late May 2016, Šešelj was acquitted by the Hague of crimes against humanity and war crimes in Croatia and Bosnia in the 1990s, but that doesn’t make his January endorsement of Trump any more acceptable. His acquittal was blamed by the ICTY’s judges on the prosecution causing confusion over his role in the ethnic cleansing of Bosnia. If Trump is being openly supported by people who are linked to ethnic cleansing and is refusing to disavow their support, then what does that say about Mr. Trump? 47. Trump is also supported by the Daily Stormer, Richard Spencer, Jared Taylor, Michael Hill, and Brad Griffin. If Donald Trump was a shepherd, white supremacists would be his flock. It’s not a coincidence that white supremacists want Trump elected. He “speaks to” them, their hatred, their ignorance. The Daily Stormer’s publisher, Andrew Anglin, announced the support of Trump for his anti-Muslim plan with statements like “Heil Donald Trump — THE ULTIMATE SAVIOR” and “Make America White Again!” Anglin also appreciates that Trump has spoken negatively about Mexicans. Richard Spencer, who is “dedidcated to the heritage, identity and future of people of European descent” sees Trump as the candidate “bringing identity politics for white people into the public sphere in a way no one has.” Spencer said, “Identity is the most important question to answer. Who are we racially? Who are we historically? Who are we in terms of our experience? Who are we in terms of our community?” He appreciated that Trump “seemed to understand and echo many of his group’s ideas intuitively, and take them to a broader audience.” He also pointed out that “there’s no direct object” in Trumps’ statement relased disavowing David Duke’s endorsement. Spencer also believes that Trump will encourage more people to turn toward his beliefs. And while he used to believe that Trump might not share the beliefs himself, he now believes that “Trump thinks like” him and that that’s why people like him love and support Trump. Donald #Trump makes us feel alive. pic.twitter.com/KkGoimK52T — Richard B. Spencer (@RichardBSpencer) July 22, 2016 We The Right-Wing Now. #GOPinCLE #Trump #BlackLivesMatter pic.twitter.com/hN9wX5JE7q — Richard B. Spencer (@RichardBSpencer) July 22, 2016 Jared Taylor was featured in pro-Trump, pro-white, anti-Muslim robocalls in Iowa by a super PAC. Taylor also appreciates Trump’s anti-Mexican rhetoric and said, “Ordinary white people don’t want the neighborhood to turn Mexican.” Trump failed to distance himself from the calls made on his behalf and even suggested that his supporters had “legitimate anger” behind their actions. Taylor has never supported a presidential candidate before, but he believes in Trump and thinks “someone who wants to send home all illegal immigrants and at least temporarily ban Muslim immigration is acting in the interest of whites, whether consciously or not.” Founder of the hate group League of the […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #43-63



“The problem the WRP faced in connecting pregnancy to their line of sex-discrimination was this: Even if a man could take care of the kids and the elders, and a woman could join the air force and handle the family finances, only one of them could get pregnant and give birth. RBG and her team had to convince the justices that pregnancy too was a matter of equality—or inequality—and not just something special that women indulged in, off on their own. Even more radically, RBG wanted the Supreme Court to recognize that women would never be equal if they could not control their reproductive lives, whether they wanted to be pregnant or not. That meant the right to an abortion, and it meant the right to be free of discrimination for staying pregnant.” – Notorious RBG by Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik via Tumblr Photo credit: national museum of american history via VisualHunt / CC BY-NC

“The problem the WRP faced in connecting pregnancy to their ...


Gather ’round, children. It’s time for the tale of why it’s not fucking okay to call Good Friday “good” and why this name bothers me so much.  As I rant about this particular tragedy in some way every year, you should have anticipated this. Now, before I begin, let’s establish that for the purpose of this post, we will assume that the traditional story of Jesus’s life, death and resurrection are legitimate. If you don’t believe in the story or God or whatever, then that’s fine. This isn’t me endorsing or promoting Christianity, so don’t get angsty. And if you’re an evangelical or conservative Christian, you might not enjoy this, so go do something else if this offends you.  Okay. Where were we?  Ah, yes.  About 1984 years ago, there was this Middle Eastern dude who got killed by a European dude for practicing the wrong religion.1 Anyway, three days later, which would be a Monday not a Sunday, the dead dude popped up & scared the shit out of everyone. We eat chocolate on Easter to commemorate the shit being scared out of people.2 Anyway, supposedly, Good Friday is “good” because the guy who died was dying to help save the world.3 His death is supposed to be symbolic, but what people don’t realize is that his death should still be considered awful. Suggesting it was good despite its horrific nature does a grotesque disservice to its victims.  Crucifixion was used by various empires, but the Romans were big fans of it. That may be because typically Roman citizens weren’t crucified. Their slaves were, as were pirates and enemies of the state. Crucifixion was meant for the lowest of the low. It was the most dishonorable death you could have. It was meant to humiliate. Death by crucifixion could take days and Roman guards couldn’t leave the site until it occurred. Since they had other shit to do, they would “hasten” death by asphyxiation, stabbing, flogging, breaking bones, and other equally pleasant measures.  Crucifixion was abolished in 337 by Constantine because of his feels for Jesus. Not because at one point 500 people per day were executed by it. No, it was because he loved Jesus. The Crucifixion is now celebrated through the symbol of the cross.4 But Good Friday is not just bad because of the evils of capital punishment, atrocities committed by the Romans, the libel perpetrated against one of the closest friends of Jesus,5 or the death and humiliation of any victims of crucifixion. Good Friday was a big player in the antisemitism that grew over the next two thousand years. You see, because it was supposedly Jews who encouraged the punishment and death of Jesus, all Jews were seen as Christ killers. They were accused of well poisoning and starting the Black Death. They were accused of greed. They were placed in ghettos as early as the 16th century. They were exiled/deported from countries for hundreds of years. They were discriminated against throughout Europe and America. They were murdered, tortured, and enslaved en masse during the Holocaust. And the big thing used to justify mass murder was the Crucifixion. So, as you talk about how “good” Good Friday is, remember millions of people died for that goodness.  As Good Friday comes around every year, I begin to feel this sense of dread and annoyance. I remember the carnage associated with it & I just feel like we missed the bigger picture. But not to worry, I’ll get over it. For a year. Of course I’ll get a little annoyed on Sunday as people commemorate the resurrection of a Jewish dude by eating ham. That’s tacky. Of course, so is eating lamb as the commemorate the resurrection of the Lamb of God. Yeah, I’m so judging y’all.  Photo via VisualHunt.com Okay, that’s a pointed summary meant to show you how little things have changed in almost two thousand years. ↩No, we don’t. But if that grosses you out & leaves more chocolate for me, then I have no regrets. ↩Who the fuck did this guy think he is? He’s not Buffy. ↩Basically, people wear little electric chairs around their necks because they think it makes them better—and more fashionable—people. ↩Judas is remembered as a villain for ratting out Jesus. If the stories are true, then he actually fulfilled the requisite action that would eventually lead to the resurrection. That should make him a hero and the people who denied Jesus the villains, but they were the ones who wrote the books, so they did a little revisionist history. Typical. ↩

“Good” Friday?!



Last night, a couple of ladies on Twitter had a whine-fest over my blocking them after I favorited and retweeted these: @LibertyBelleCJL anti-gun control/pro death penalty nut who loves fetuses.. — LaurelMd (@PanchoPanucci) September 24, 2015 @CaseyParksIt @LibertyBelleCJL 'protecting life' with anti-gun control, pro death penalty, pro war?..get a clue.. — LaurelMd (@PanchoPanucci) September 24, 2015 They thought that I was the friend of PanchoPanucci, but I simply found those tweets after searching through the #DefundPP hashtag. I favorited and retweeted them because I agreed that there is a good deal of hypocrisy within that movement. Ladies, I'm not her friend. But if you want to read my tweets regarding #defundpp I'll unblock you. https://t.co/2VZX5BBvNR — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 You can find out what I REALLY think of you. https://t.co/2VZX5BBvNR — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 @_wintergirl93 @LibertyBelleCJL Go ahead, girls. I had you blocked before even reading those tweets. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 When they found out that I had them blocked before even finding their tweets, they had to throw a fit. How could anyone ever want to block them? They’re just too perfect for that. Clearly, I’m doing something awful to decide that I don’t want to interact with people who I think will only cause drama and spread hate. I figure that they were upset because they feel that they have a right to be heard by every single person on earth. Just because you have the right to share your beliefs and opinions with the world doesn’t mean that the world will listen to you. Why does it even matter who I am? Yes, I prematurely block people. Most are individuals who follow racists. https://t.co/7Hkv3hACCo — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Actually I'm very confident in my position. Why should I not block people who follow bigots? Or those who name call? https://t.co/rMEfYhdVSA — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 What? You WOULDN'T block people who follow actual Neo-Nazis, Klan members, & people preaching white supremacy? https://t.co/GNpD2JLpTC — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 @_wintergirl93 Look at accounts under the various hashtags for white supremacy. If you see someone you follow, that's why you were blocked. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 They even had to have their friends come to the rescue.1 It was not at all surprising. Nah, you can just check those hashtags. I'm sure you'll find 'em. https://t.co/MdCgCagLeG — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 And, of course, supporting Planned Parenthood means I don’t understand what racism actually is, or that a lot of old companies and organizations had ties to various racist groups and regimes. Guess what, folks! Margaret Sanger was not the only racist alive in the 20th Century. There were a lot of them and there were some who had a direct hand in actual atrocities. How do you feel about Volkswagen, Porsche, Hugo Boss, Bayer, IBM, Daimler, Kellogg & BASF? https://t.co/bxrGrVicpW — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 That tweet seemed to scare most of them off, but I basically warned off any future comments with: Dear #DefundPP, Every time you take an Aspirin made by Bayer & every time you hear about Sarin gas, remember this: http://t.co/eRjzOJk7qJ — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 I've heard enough about how Margaret Sanger was an eugenicist & how people who support #PlannedParenthood now are responsible for that. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 If you bring up Sanger, I may bring up some companies or individuals that I'm sure you've supported that have ties to Nazis & other racists. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 25, 2015 I hope that maybe they’ll get the message, but I really doubt it. They were actually encouraging their friends to do this. ↩

#DefundPP is Full of Hypocrisy




Seriously, this comment was left on my review of For Such a Time by Kate Breslin: It’s not an easy read, dealing with a dark and hellish time in history, the Nazi occupation of Germany, but it’s a worthwhile and powerful read. Hadassah Benjamin is half-Jewish and believed she’d be protected by her Aryan-like looks; SS Kommandant Colonel Aric von Schmidt is head of the transit concentration camp Theresienstadt in Czechoslovakia. Getting spam related to the book only makes the book seem more disgusting. And it tarnishes my opinion of spam quite a bit, too. (Not that I was a fan of it either.) When did spam switch to Christian Inspiration fiction set during the Holocaust? I thought they stuck to drugs and sexual dysfunction. via Tumblr




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For Such a Time by Kate Breslin My rating: 1 of 5 stars Recommended for: Anne Rice; anyone who thinks that the dislike of this book is unfounded; bigots I’ve read many books that I could classify as “bad books” over the years, but this one is quite special in how awful it truly was. There was nothing enjoyable about Kate Breslin’s debut novel For Such a Time. First, let’s tackle something that was brought up repeatedly in the book and in its official descriptions. The lead female character Hadassah Benjamin (known through most of the novel as Stella Muller) has blonde hair and blue eyes. On the back of the copy I checked out of the local library, it is specifically described as, “her Aryan-like looks allow her to hide behind the false identity of Stella Muller.” According to the official description on Amazon’s app, the description starts, “In 1944, blonde and blue-eyed Jewess Hadassah Benjamin feels abandoned by God when she is saved from a firing squad only to be handed over to a new enemy.” On page 14 of the story, she is described this way, “Morty once told her that her beauty would save her–a “changeling,” he’d called his young niece, Stella’s blond hair and blue eyes a rarity among their people.” Early in the war, this might have protected her, but it wouldn’t have been guaranteed. When you consider that Werner Goldberg, the man who was literally the poster boy for the Aryan ideal, was expelled from the army in 1940 when it was discovered he was a “1st degree Mischilinge” and had to help his father escape a hospital in 1943 so that he wouldn’t be deported to Auschwitz, you can be sure that appearance wouldn’t guarantee the safety of a non-influential light-haired, light-eyed Jewish girl. And the supposed rarity of the trait is questionable due to the fact that now 32% of German-Jewish children also have blond hair. Brown (light and dark) and black hair each have slightly percentages than that. One would assume that the dark hair stereotype is just that, a stereotype. By focusing so much attention on the appearance of this woman who is also described as a savior, it is promoting a white supremacist ideal of beauty and moral value, while simultaneously justifying that ideal’s belief of punishing those who don’t fit their narrow standards of beauty. Somehow her beauty is able to trick Aric into believing that she isn’t really Jewish and that the papers that have been stamped saying that she is must have been wrong. Aric will eventually blame her for not telling him that she is Jewish and for not telling him that she did not support the Nazi’s cause. This is after he has seen her traumatized at the brutal killing of Anna while in a camp. He saw that this broke her spirit, but he believes she still might be willing to support Hitler and his group of bigoted, sociopathic thugs. Her beauty and position as Aric’s secretary also seem to convince every Nazi officer that she must be a prostitute. She even calls herself a “brazen hussy” when she is forced to kis Hermann in order to save the life of Joseph, Aric’s houseboy. And Hermann muses that she is a sorceress using her beauty to bewitch the Commandant into sympathizing with the prisoners. (Of course, Hermann also calls women weak-minded and mere vessels for man’s use, so he’s not exactly a great example of non-sexist thinking.) Another serious issue is the repeated use of rape and assault as a way to threaten Hadassah/Stella into doing things & the underlying Stockholm Syndrome-esque quality of the relationship between her and Aric. When she first meets Aric von Schmidt, she tells him that the Gestapo assaulted her in some way and suggests that it may have been a sexual assault attempt. He classifies their behavior as a prank. Twenty five pages into the book, he threatens her with being returned to Dachau while he tries to seduce her. She is reminded over and over that she is essentially his prisoner, that she has no true sense of free will or personhood, but that she should be thankful for his saving her and for his attraction to her. When she has a traumatic flashback in a nightmare around page 47, Aric expects her to be thankful that he’s moved her to Czechoslovakia with him, but he’s threatening her with being sent back. He even uses sexual innuendo in these conversations, while having no regard for the suffering that she has been through. All that he cares about is that attraction he has. And he tries to make that attraction seem more important than what he knows, as he witnessed some of it, she’s been through. He threatens her when she doesn’t want to do as he has told her, tells her he will send her to Dachau for not eating, forces her to eat food pork, forces her to type of the lists sending prisoners to Auschwitz, forces her to sit through meals as Aric and other SS officers talk about the benefits of slave labor in the camps and ghettos, threatens to kill people unless she kisses him, and forces her to agree to marry him. As I read the story, I saw his behavior as similar to Christian Grey’s behavior in the Fifty Shades series, only Aric was so much more vile. When the book started, Hadassah saw Aric as a “Jew Killer” and a potential threat to her safety. By page 82, she has begun to trust him, while knowing that he could turn on her at any moment if he found out who/what she really is. This is so reminiscent of Stockholm Syndrome. She is living in the home of an SS-Commandant and sees him as a good person who doesn’t really want to hurt Jews. She doesn’t recognize that he continuously fails to show real compassion for the prisoners in […]

Review: For Such a Time