Crime


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If you’ve been following me on Twitter, you know that I am currently rather pissed at the Huntsville CBS affiliate, WHNT, for their planned special tonight called the Dark Side of All Hallows’ Eve. In the ads for their story talk about Huntsville’s police department once having a special occult crime division. The ads also feature images of Jeffrey Franklin and comments about the crimes he committed on March 10, 1998. Jeffrey killed his parents before trying to kill three of his four siblings on that night. He also attacked the best friend of his 14-year old sister. I can tell you a lot about the night. More than a lot of people can. His sister was my friend. His sister’s friend was also my friend and on Yearbook staff with me; she talked about that night in class. My mom was the person who carried the medical records of his sister to the hospital. She stayed there until my friend was in the ICU. We went back to the hospital on a regular basis until it was time for them to leave town. From the start, Jeffrey was painted as evil by the media. Even when the evidence came to light that he had 10 times the normal dose of Ritalin in his blood twelve days after the crime.1 Even when people started mentioning that he was mentally ill. Even when the state of Alabama thought he was mentally incompetent from 1999 until 2001, and even though the state of Alabama has had him in the mental healthcare unit of the prison since his sentencing began, instead of in general population, he has been portrayed as this supernatural killer. That kind of stigmatizing attitude is damaging to the whole community and it needs to stop. Personally, I’m tired of reliving that night. It’s been almost twenty years and local news outlets are still pushing it. They keep trying to make a buck off of the suffering of my friend’s family. They keep trying to profit on the suffering of the people I grew up with, of the choir that we were in together, of me, of my mom. This has to stop at some point. I know that the story was shocking and gruesome and that it sticks with people. It’s stuck with me, too. At a certain point, enough is enough. I wish he hadn’t made the choices he did that night. I wish that a lot of things were different about that whole situation. But forcing us to go through it over and over is cruel. He had been in jail since the night it occurred. ↩

And then I fell down yelling, “Make it go away!”


After watching Audrie & Daisy, I seriously hope that Darren White loses his bid to be reelected. I know documentaries don’t always give you the full picture, but it’s clear that he doesn’t respect rape & sexual assault victims. This is one Democratic candidate I would never vote for, and a race where I’m actually hopeful the Republican wins. His bias was clear. Daisy Coleman deserved more from his department. He failed her. He failed the people of Nodaway County, and the bullying & vandalism that took place after her rape is proof that he is also unable to keep the peace in his community. He does not deserve to be a law enforcement officer anymore. Unfortunately, I don’t believe he will lose. If the people of Nodaway County and Maryville can be so hateful toward a rape victim based upon who raped her, then they might not even care about the miscarriage of justice by Darren White. Maybe they’ll prove me wrong and elect Randy Strong. I hope they do.

I Hope the Nodaway County Sheriff Loses



Just a few more reasons to oppose the Talking Piece of Candy Corn Trump.   172. Didn’t correct audience member who called Obama Muslim before ranting about Muslims. Right after an audience member stated, “We have a problem in this country. It’s called Muslims. You know our current president is one. You know he’s not even an American.”, Trump said, “We need this question. This is the first question.” The audience member went on to ask, “When can we get rid of them?” Instead of correcting the audience member on both the ethnic cleansing idea and the Obama’s religion and nationality, Trump gave a vague answer about how he would look at and do plenty of things. After receiving a lot of backlash, Trump said he wasn’t “morally obligated” to defend Obama. Okay. How about being morally obligated to say that ethnic cleansing is awful? How about that? 173. Tweets sound like an adolescent. If you haven’t noticed, you haven’t been paying attention. It’s even become a joke. 174. Would shut borders on Day 1. During a Twitter question and answer session in September 2015, Trump said, “The first thing I’d do in my first day as president is close up our borders so that illegal immigrants cannot come into our country.” This was before his “total and complete shutdown” of borders to Muslims proposal after San Bernardino and the renewed call after Brussels. 175. “Why aren’t we letting ISIS go and fight Assad and then we pick up the remnants?” On 60 Minutes Scott Pelley: We’re at war with ISIS as we sit here. How do you end it? Donald Trump: I would end ISIS forcefully. I think ISIS, what they did, was unbelievable what they did with James Foley and with the cutting off of heads of everybody, I mean these people are totally a disaster. Now, let me just say this, ISIS in Syria, Assad in Syria, Assad and ISIS are mortal enemies. We go in to fight ISIS. Why aren’t we letting ISIS go and fight Assad and then we pick up the remnants? Why are we doing this? We’re fighting ISIS and Assad has to be saying to himself, “They have the nicest or dumbest people that I’ve ever imagined.” Scott Pelley: Let me get this right, so we lay off ISIS for now? Donald Trump: Excuse me, let — Scott Pelley: Lay off in Syria, let them destroy Assad. And then we go in behind that? Donald Trump: –that’s what I would say. Yes, that’s what I would say. Then… Donald Trump: If you look at Syria. Russia wants to get rid of ISIS. We want to get rid of ISIS. Maybe let Russia do it. Let ’em get rid of ISIS. What the hell do we care? Scott Pelley: OK, that’s Syria. What do you–do in Iraq– Donald Trump: With that– Scott Pelley: –with ISIS? Donald Trump: Look with ISIS in Iraq, you gotta knock ’em out. You gotta knock ’em out. You gotta fight ’em. You gotta fight ’em. You have to stand– Scott Pelley: On the ground? Donald Trump: –if you need, you’re going to have to do that, yes. Scott Pelley: Troops on the ground. Donald Trump: Yes. 176. Says Muslims believe America should be governed by shariah. Trump cited a highly flawed poll that found that 51% of American Muslims should have the choice of being governed according to shariah. That poll had come from an organization known for dubious claims and studies about the threat of shariah and used unreliable methodology. Trump used the poll’s findings to base his ban on Muslims entering the United States. Trump has also allied with individuals like Roger Stone, who accused Khizr Khan of wanting to initiate shariah and oppress women & gays, and kill Christians. If elected, Trump would be the first Facebook meme to be elected President of the United States. 177. “We have places in London and other places that are so radicalised that the police are afraid for their own lives. We have to be very smart and very vigilant.” London’s Metropolitan police responded, “We would not normally dignify such comments with a response, however, on this occasion we think it’s important to state to Londoners that Mr Trump could not be more wrong.” The Met thought that Trump’s claim was also potentially damaging, and Downing Street also criticized his message. Even Boris Johnson, who is basically a British Trump, thought the comments were “complete and utter nonsense” and remarked that “crime has been falling steadily both in London and in New York–the only reason I wouldn’t go to some parts of New York is the real risk of meeting Donald Trump.” Apparently British Trump occasionally has better sense than Donald Trump. 178. Did not say anything about Jo Cox’s death, but comments every time a story of murder linked to Muslim extremists breaks. When Jo Cox was assassinated by a man yelling “Britain first” who had supported far-right groups with similar ideologies to Trump, Trump said nothing. When fans of his celebrated her death, he said nothing. She’s been dead for over a month and he still hasn’t commented. But whenever there’s even a slight possibility that a crime has been committed by someone he thinks is Muslim, he’s won’t stop talking about it. Gee. I wonder if he’s only seeing one group as actual terrorists. What would he do if far-right terrorists here attacked left-wing advocates & politicians? 179. Called Libya Hillary’s baby, and wasn’t referring to Benghazi. On Face the Nation in January, Trump said, “She has caused death. She has caused tremendous death with incompetent decisions. I was against the war in Iraq. I wasn’t a politician, but I was against the war in Iraq. She voted for the war in Iraq…Look at Libya. That was her baby. Look. I mean, I’m not even talking about the ambassador and the people with the ambassador.” I wish someone would explain to him that his opinions on Libya don’t matter, especially since […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #172-184


In case you haven’t figured it out yet, I loathe Donald Trump and don’t want the man to be President. I’m in the process of publishing a list of 2016 reasons to oppose him. Trump’s followers have a tendency to ask for reasons why people don’t like them and they tend to dismiss them as having no basis in reality. They even suggest that Mr. Trump has been misunderstood by the media and by people who’ve watched his speeches live. This list will hopefully show that Donald Trump has been advocating for some pretty awful stuff throughout his career as a real-estate-developer-turned-reality-television-star-turned-presidential-candidate. His “gaffes” aren’t new, nor is his bigotry. And alleging a 43 year campaign by the media to smear him and ruin his chance at becoming President is a big clue that he is the one who is saying things that are not based in reality. 132. Opposed to a living wage, then for it, then opposed to it… I don’t even know if Trump knows how he feels about raising the minimum wage at this point. He can’t keep his story straight if asked twice within a twenty-four-to-forty-eight hour period. I wonder if he contemplates raising the minimum wage while sitting on his gold throne. 133. Blamed concept of climate change on China. He now claims his 2012 tweet about China creating a climate change hoax was a joke. You know, like his hacking joke and his “blood coming out of her whatever” joke. It’s a good thing that Donald didn’t go into stand-up comedy because his comedy career would deplete the world of its tomatoes. Anyway, the supposed joke is something that he’s referenced repeatedly, even before he joked about it. If it’s really a “joke”, and “it isn’t, then even he doesn’t get it. 134. Taxing Chinese exports. He wants to put a forty-five percent tariff on Chinese exports. In other news, the zombie form of George III is planning on suing Donald Trump for using his shtick of supporting outrageously high taxes. 135. His claim of beating China in trade deals. He backed it up by saying that he owns part of a Bank of American building that he got from China in a war. Actually, it was a result of a relationship between Hong Kong billionaires and Trump after they helped rescue him from having to file another bankruptcy on a property; when the property was sold without his support, Trump waged a legal battle with them. That chunk of the bank building he bragged about getting was something he had to settle for after he lost the legal battle. 136. Said US leaders would invite El Chapo to become a citizen. Someone in his family or his campaign needs to take his Twitter account away from him. 137. Calls himself the least racist. Considering his lack of understanding of how even the simplest things work, it’s unsurprising that he considers himself to not be a racist. 138. Bragged about a former employee calling him the least sexist boss she’d ever had. Apparently, he didn’t realize that she didn’t say that he wasn’t sexist, just that he was the least sexist. 139. Stacie J. While Trump wants to capitalize on his fame from The Apprentice in this election, it’s important to remember every single time he did something flat-out-wrong on that show. Case in point, his treatment of Stacie J. Other competitors portrayed her as mentally ill because she consulted a Magic 8-Ball toy before her team did their tasks. He called her a “loose cannon” and fired her, violating the Americans with Disability Act of 1990. He fired her simply for behaving in a way that was perceived as being due to mental illness. 140. Trump stigmatizing the mentally ill. This is a continuation of the Stacie J situation. Because of Stacie’s quirky behavior he said, “This comes from two people, Stacie, that don’t like each other at all. The first thing they’ve agreed on is that you’re crazy…Stacie, if you have a problem, I don’t want you running my companies.” This suggests that Trump refuses to hire or continue to employ mentally ill people. This is backed up by his use of ableist terms like “nut job”, “crazy” and “wacko” to demean Jeb Bush, Bernie Sanders, Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, and Elizabeth Warren. He conflates mental illness with crime and said that gun-free zones that gun-free zones are “target practice for the sickos and for the mentally ill.” A man who willingly tears down the mentally ill should not be in charge of a country where 25% of the population is believed to have a mental illness; and at least two-thirds are either unaware of it or are going untreated for it. 141. Painted himself as the hero of NYC in New York Times article in 1983. According to Trump, he alone is responsible for Grand Central being renovated and hotel jobs being saved. 142. Doesn’t like compromise. He told Life magazine in January 1989, “I’m not big on compromise. I understand compromise. Sometimes compromise is the right answer, but oftentimes compromise is the equivalent of defeat, and I don’t like being defeated.” 143. He suggested success/deal-making is genetic; that people who don’t succeed are afraid to or are “life’s losers”. In 1984, he told Lois Romano of the Washington Post, “Some people have an ability to negotiate. It’s an art you’re basically born with. You either have it or you don’t.” In The Art of the Deal, Trump said, “Most people think small, because most people are afraid of success, afraid of making decisions, afraid of winning.” He also said, “One of the problems when you become successful is that jealousy and envy inevitably follow. There are people—I categorize them as life’s losers—who get their sense of accomplishment and achievement from trying to stop others. As far as I’m concerned, if they had any real ability they wouldn’t be fighting me, they’d be doing something constructive themselves.” 144. […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #132-158



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Another day, another detailed list of why Trump should not be President. And guess what else happens today? The Democratic National Convention starts. Yay! If you’re surprised that I’m a Democrat, you’re obviously new here. And if you’re new here, then you don’t realize that I’m posting 21 reasons every day for 99 days to show why Donald Trump should never be the President of the United States. I’m not trying to push any of the other candidates in these posts, even if I do prefer one party to all the others. Now that I’ve gotten through with the disclaimer-esque statement, let’s get on to the discussion of Trump’s failings. Let’s see, we left off with Donald Trump allowing a racist gambler to dictate how he ran his casino, so let’s go to a similar claim about Mr. Trump and his casinos for number 43. 43. When Donald and Ivana would go to the casino, the bosses would order all black employees off the floor. For a man who vehemently denies racism, he’s done a lot of racist stuff. No one knows if it was just the bosses at his Atlantic City properties who made the order or if it was an order from the boss-man himself, but Kip Brown, a former employee, told The New Yorker about the “policy” last summer. 44. Donald Trump called black people lazy and said he only wants Jewish people counting his money. In Trumped!: The Inside Story of the Real Donald Trump — His Cunning Rise and Spectacular Fall by John O’Donnell, one-time president of the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, says that Trump once told him: “Yeah, I never liked the guy. I don’t think he knows what the fuck he’s doing. My accountants up in New York are always complaining about him. He’s not responsive. And isn’t it funny, I’ve got black accountants at Trump Castle and at Trump Plaza. Black guys counting my money! I hate it. The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day. Those are the kind of people I want counting my money. Nobody else.” Trump continued with, “Besides that, I’ve got to tell you something else. I think that the guy is lazy. And it’s probably not his fault because laziness is a trait in blacks. It really is, I believe that. It’s not anything they can control…Don’t you agree?” When interviewed by Mark Bowden for Playboy magazine in 1997, Trump responded that the account was probably true; but in 2016, he said that it was fiction. Are you starting to get the feeling that his claims of not being racist are a little disingenuous? 45. Trump was sued for lack of diverse employees in 1996 at a riverboat casino. Trump was sued by 20 African Americans in Indiana for failing to hire mostly minority workers for a Lake Michigan riverboat casino. Trump had promised that 70% of his workforce at the floating casino would be made of members of the minority community and 52% would be women. The lawsuit also alleged that he hasn’t honored commitments to steer contracts to minority-owned businesses in Gary. 46. Donald Trump is supported by Vojislav Šešelj. Admittedly, in late May 2016, Šešelj was acquitted by the Hague of crimes against humanity and war crimes in Croatia and Bosnia in the 1990s, but that doesn’t make his January endorsement of Trump any more acceptable. His acquittal was blamed by the ICTY’s judges on the prosecution causing confusion over his role in the ethnic cleansing of Bosnia. If Trump is being openly supported by people who are linked to ethnic cleansing and is refusing to disavow their support, then what does that say about Mr. Trump? 47. Trump is also supported by the Daily Stormer, Richard Spencer, Jared Taylor, Michael Hill, and Brad Griffin. If Donald Trump was a shepherd, white supremacists would be his flock. It’s not a coincidence that white supremacists want Trump elected. He “speaks to” them, their hatred, their ignorance. The Daily Stormer’s publisher, Andrew Anglin, announced the support of Trump for his anti-Muslim plan with statements like “Heil Donald Trump — THE ULTIMATE SAVIOR” and “Make America White Again!” Anglin also appreciates that Trump has spoken negatively about Mexicans. Richard Spencer, who is “dedidcated to the heritage, identity and future of people of European descent” sees Trump as the candidate “bringing identity politics for white people into the public sphere in a way no one has.” Spencer said, “Identity is the most important question to answer. Who are we racially? Who are we historically? Who are we in terms of our experience? Who are we in terms of our community?” He appreciated that Trump “seemed to understand and echo many of his group’s ideas intuitively, and take them to a broader audience.” He also pointed out that “there’s no direct object” in Trumps’ statement relased disavowing David Duke’s endorsement. Spencer also believes that Trump will encourage more people to turn toward his beliefs. And while he used to believe that Trump might not share the beliefs himself, he now believes that “Trump thinks like” him and that that’s why people like him love and support Trump. Donald #Trump makes us feel alive. pic.twitter.com/KkGoimK52T — Richard B. Spencer (@RichardBSpencer) July 22, 2016 We The Right-Wing Now. #GOPinCLE #Trump #BlackLivesMatter pic.twitter.com/hN9wX5JE7q — Richard B. Spencer (@RichardBSpencer) July 22, 2016 Jared Taylor was featured in pro-Trump, pro-white, anti-Muslim robocalls in Iowa by a super PAC. Taylor also appreciates Trump’s anti-Mexican rhetoric and said, “Ordinary white people don’t want the neighborhood to turn Mexican.” Trump failed to distance himself from the calls made on his behalf and even suggested that his supporters had “legitimate anger” behind their actions. Taylor has never supported a presidential candidate before, but he believes in Trump and thinks “someone who wants to send home all illegal immigrants and at least temporarily ban Muslim immigration is acting in the interest of whites, whether consciously or not.” Founder of the hate group League of the […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #43-63


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Sometimes in life I feel the urge to rant about things that bother me and, guess what, Trump bothers me. A lot. So I decided since it’s the 2016 election that I would come up with 2016 reasons not to vote for Trump. Of course I realize this may not convince people to not vote for him, but it will allow me to express reasons he should never be the President of the United States. I know 2016 is a lot of reasons to come up with, but I believe I can come up with them. I will try to remember to include links to information backing up reason so that you will see that this isn’t just me making baseless accusations. There will be 99 posts of 21 reasons each over the next 99 or so days. This will give enough time before the election to get all 2016 reasons out.1 1. Trump is a liar.  As of July 23, 2016, only 29% of statements made by Donald Trump are considered Half True—15%, Mostly True–10%, or True–4% by Politifact. Even during his RNC convention speech, Trump couldn’t avoid lying.2 The Washington Post has accused him of being “pathologically dishonest“; the National Review labeled him the “post-truth candidate“. 2. Trump was accused of raping his first wife, Ivana Trump. During a deposition for their divorce, Ivana described a sexual assault perpetrated by Donald against her in 1989. When the rape was discussed in a 2015 article on The Daily Beast, Michael Cohen, special counsel at The Trump Organization said: “You’re talking about the frontrunner for the GOP, presidential candidate, as well as a private individual who never raped anybody. And, of course, understand that by the very definition, you can’t rape your spouse…It is true…You cannot rape your spouse. And there’s very clear case law.”3 3. Trump was accused of attempting to rape Jill Harth. In 1997, Harth filed a suit against Trump alleging that he sexually assaulted her in 1993. Harth also accused Trump of repeated, unwanted sexual advances. She claims he groped her under the table at a restaurant and he pushed her up against the wall of his daughter’s bedroom and groped her again. The lawsuit was settled, though Trump denied the allegations. 4. Trump was accused of raping a thirteen-year old girl. The girl, publicly refered to as Katie Johnson, filed a lawsuit accusing Trump and Jeffrey Epstein of having solicited sex from her at sex parties at their homes in Manhattan in 1994. She claims Trump “took her virginity in 1994 when she was only 13 and being held by Epstein as a slave.” She said they threatened her family and her with harm if she didn’t comply. The claims were corroberated by a person referred to as Tiffany Doe. 5. Trump was implicated in the rape and disappearance of a twelve-year old girl. Katie Johnson’s lawsuit alleges that she was forced to participate in sex acts with a girl referred to as Maria Doe for the enjoyment of Donald Trump. Johnson claimed that Trump told her she “shouldn’t ever say anything if I didn’t want to disappear like Maria, a 12-year-old female that was forced to be involved in the third incident with Defendant Trump and that I had not seen since that third incident, and that he was capable of having my whole family killed.” These claims were also corroberated by Tiffany Doe. 6. Donald Trump is a birther. Remember when Trump decided to accuse Obama of not being born in Hawaii, meaning he couldn’t be the American president? Yeah, it was quite the story. And guess what? He still identifies as one, despite evidence that Obama was born in the country.4 Birtherism is blatant xenophobia, which has become Trump’s favorite -phobia. Well, aside from Islamophobia. And homophobia.  7. In his campaign announcement speech, he accused Mexico of sending rapists and drug dealers. Supporters of Trump like to point out that Trump followed that up with the statement that “some, I assume, are good people“—which doesn’t make it any better. It’s like telling someone that the bowl of strawberries they handed you has rotten berries in it, but that some aren’t actually rotten. It’s a xenophobic, good-luck-guessing-who-is-bad statement. It’s fear-mongering. Trump supporters really ate those rotten berries up. And guess what? It’s pretty much bullshit. 8. Trump used slave labor in Dubai. Slave labor was used to build Trump International Golf Course in Dubai. This was supposed to be the “greatest golf course in the world” according to the more-humble-than-you-know Trump. Workers made less than $200 a month and lived in squalorous conditions. 9. Trump has been accused of sexual harassment and humiliation by former employees. This year, Elizabeth Davidson filed a complaint with the Davenport Civil Rights Commission over remarks made by Trump while she was working for his campaign in Iowa. He has been accused by multiple women of mocking or degrading women working for him, using dismissive and sexist language to refer to them. 10. Trump has stated that he is attracted to his daughter, Ivanka Trump. Multiple times. His first caveat with his incestuous attraction is that he’s married, not that she’s his daughter. He joked about how she’s she could be in Playboy and that he could date her.  He only asserts that he’s her father and couldn’t date her as a side note. 11. Trump sexualized Tiffany as an infant. In an interview, Trump stated he’d like his then one-year olds daughter Tiffany to inherit her mom’s breasts. 12. Trump is hypocritical on Clinton’s vs. Pence’s support of the Iraq War. In last week’s 60 Minutes, Trump defended Pence voting for the Iraq War, while simultaneously bashing Hillary Clinton for her vote. Pence is, according to Trump, entitled to make mistakes. Hypocrisy, Party of Don. 13. Trump is hypocritical over receiving money/favors from Saudi Arabia. In another case of “do as I say, not as I do”, Trump likes to imply that Hillary has received money from Saudi Arabia either personally or for her […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump — Reasons #1-21



The Long Shadow of Small Ghosts: Murder and Memory in an American City by Laura Tillman My rating: 3 of 5 stars I don’t know how to explain my feelings toward this book. It is an extremely compelling story, but the writing quality is poor. There seemed to be no real outline or backbone to it. The purple prose only highlighted this flaw, as did the repetition of unimportant things and the lack of refreshers given for details that seemed more important. If all you knew about the case was the manner in which Julissa, John Stephon, and Mary Jane died, then it would seem impossible to feel bad for John Allen Rubio and Angela Camacho, but what happened to them within the justice system is awful for other reasons. This is a case where a man with a severe mental illness (paranoid schizophrenia) and an intellectual disability (IQ in the low 70s) and a woman who had a shared psychosis with this man because of her own intellectual disability (IQ in the 50s) end up imprisoned, and, for him, end up on death row, but the writer is busy talking about superstitions & personal fears. It’s almost like she doesn’t completely perceive the gravity of the situation, the level of injustice that’s going on. As lovely as it is to learn about regional cultural beliefs, I was more concerned about the fact that this man who should be in a hospital will probably face lethal injection. The writer could only view this as horrible once she met Mr. Rubio, but it seems like anyone with a basic sense of compassion would figure out after learning about his background. Instead, she was oblivious to it, which made her seem callous. It made the whole book feel callous. Also, the stalking of Ms. Camacho’s family was a bit disturbing. I understand she felt that she needed to hear from them for her newspaper article and her book, but her behavior was quite creepy. I’m surprised that they didn’t issue a restraining order after the second or third time she showed up outside the woman’s front door. The writing honestly reminded me of what you’d find in an essay by a bored, uninformed student who waited until the last minute to do an assignment. I have a hard time believing that this is something the writer was encouraged to get published, at least in its current form. I have no doubt that she has talent, but the fixations on pointless details within the work are distracting and annoying. I wish she had explained more about Rubio’s mental health than how a superstitious grandmother convinced her to throw away a perfectly good pair of tennis shoes. This wasn’t her memoir. This wasn’t even a memoir for the building. It was an unfocused work of nonfiction that was rather disappointing. View all my reviews

Review: The Long Shadow of Small Ghosts: Murder and Memory ...


via Instagram “Shortly after John’s arrest, and his diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia, he was put on several medications. He told me he was taking Prozac, for depression, Benadryl, and Risperdal, an antipsychotic. This made it hard for me to know what an unmedicated John sounded like. He said he had occasional visions, what some might call hallucinations, but these days he tried to ignore them, a self-preservation technique schizophrenics sometimes use to deal with an illness that can be manageable but is never curable. He said that the two years following the crimes, the visions were much worse, and his sincere wish was to die and join his children in heaven. “I did not get the sense that John was trying to manipulate me, but I’m not a psychiatrist.” How is it ethical or moral to execute a man with severe mental health issues? How is it ethical to put him in a prison and not a hospital setting?

The man described is on death row, which bothers me.




I cannot believe such a horrible and exploitative show was ever greenlit. Actually, considering that A&E has shows that publicly shame hoarders and addicts, it really isn’t surprising they would expand their dehumanization to sex workers. It’s also not surprising that they misrepresent prostitution with their assumptions that prostitution is always human trafficking or than all prostitutes have pimps. They also portray the women as being morally and emotionally weak. They’re also shown as being unintelligent, drug addicts, and bad parents. It seems that they (including the “advocates” who are former prostitutes who shame and yell at the “victims”)1 don’t view these women as being fully human because of their profession. That’s really gross. The attitude of “Pastor Kevin” and his team towards prostitution, as well as the actual lack of resources that they provide to the women they’re “rescuing” is reminiscent of crisis pregnancy centers. There are grand promises they make to these women, but the reality of how they “rescue” them is a hotline number, a prayer, and a bunch of empty promises. None are trained to actually help or identify the people they claim to be rescuing. They coerce these women into talking about traumas and life stressors to at least two total strangers in the eight minute timeframe. They try to make these women trust them & seem shocked when they aren’t “empowered” to change. They seem shocked when they aren’t ready to leave a potentially abusive situation to go with a group of people who have emotionally abused you & lied to you in the less than ten minutes that you have known them. Human rights and sex worker advocates have rightly called them out for doing more harm than good to these women & to the cause of ending human trafficking. And when there are even reports that the women that said yes are being reported to cops? Yeah, that really sounds like they want to advocate for these people. And their idea that they are saving these women or that all sex workers need saving really speaks more to the egos of the “savior” than it does the SW. This show is messed up. I view the advocates as people who are dealing with Stockholm Syndrome. ↩

Review: 8 Minutes