Classism


I’m not sure how many posts this will take, but I thought it was worth documenting. @brettwestny @DonnaVishio “Uneducated dicks with guns” is practically the slogan of the state of Mississippi. Perhaps we should disarm MS. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 23, 2017 @brettwestny @DonnaVishio I’m not. Have you ever looked at how Mississippi ranks in education? Plenty of people in “the hood” are educated. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017 @brettwestny @DonnaVishio Being impoverished doesn’t mean you are less intelligent. It just means you’re poor. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017 @brettwestny @Olivianuzzi I’m disabled, bro. If Trump wants to improve my circumstances he could give SSI recipients more than $750/month. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017 @brettwestny @Olivianuzzi There isn’t a damn thing wrong with my attitude. Yours needs work. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017 @brettwestny @DonnaVishio Right. Anything that can disprove your claim that people “in the hood” are uneducated isn’t worth sharing. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017 @brettwestny @DonnaVishio It’s not unfair to expect all children receive the same quality education. In fact, that’s the opposite of unfair. — Janet Morris (@janersm) February 24, 2017

In case you haven’t figured it out yet, I loathe Donald Trump and don’t want the man to be President. I’m in the process of publishing a list of 2016 reasons to oppose him. Trump’s followers have a tendency to ask for reasons why people don’t like them and they tend to dismiss them as having no basis in reality. They even suggest that Mr. Trump has been misunderstood by the media and by people who’ve watched his speeches live. This list will hopefully show that Donald Trump has been advocating for some pretty awful stuff throughout his career as a real-estate-developer-turned-reality-television-star-turned-presidential-candidate. His “gaffes” aren’t new, nor is his bigotry. And alleging a 43 year campaign by the media to smear him and ruin his chance at becoming President is a big clue that he is the one who is saying things that are not based in reality. 132. Opposed to a living wage, then for it, then opposed to it… I don’t even know if Trump knows how he feels about raising the minimum wage at this point. He can’t keep his story straight if asked twice within a twenty-four-to-forty-eight hour period. I wonder if he contemplates raising the minimum wage while sitting on his gold throne. 133. Blamed concept of climate change on China. He now claims his 2012 tweet about China creating a climate change hoax was a joke. You know, like his hacking joke and his “blood coming out of her whatever” joke. It’s a good thing that Donald didn’t go into stand-up comedy because his comedy career would deplete the world of its tomatoes. Anyway, the supposed joke is something that he’s referenced repeatedly, even before he joked about it. If it’s really a “joke”, and “it isn’t, then even he doesn’t get it. 134. Taxing Chinese exports. He wants to put a forty-five percent tariff on Chinese exports. In other news, the zombie form of George III is planning on suing Donald Trump for using his shtick of supporting outrageously high taxes. 135. His claim of beating China in trade deals. He backed it up by saying that he owns part of a Bank of American building that he got from China in a war. Actually, it was a result of a relationship between Hong Kong billionaires and Trump after they helped rescue him from having to file another bankruptcy on a property; when the property was sold without his support, Trump waged a legal battle with them. That chunk of the bank building he bragged about getting was something he had to settle for after he lost the legal battle. 136. Said US leaders would invite El Chapo to become a citizen. Someone in his family or his campaign needs to take his Twitter account away from him. 137. Calls himself the least racist. Considering his lack of understanding of how even the simplest things work, it’s unsurprising that he considers himself to not be a racist. 138. Bragged about a former employee calling him the least sexist boss she’d ever had. Apparently, he didn’t realize that she didn’t say that he wasn’t sexist, just that he was the least sexist. 139. Stacie J. While Trump wants to capitalize on his fame from The Apprentice in this election, it’s important to remember every single time he did something flat-out-wrong on that show. Case in point, his treatment of Stacie J. Other competitors portrayed her as mentally ill because she consulted a Magic 8-Ball toy before her team did their tasks. He called her a “loose cannon” and fired her, violating the Americans with Disability Act of 1990. He fired her simply for behaving in a way that was perceived as being due to mental illness. 140. Trump stigmatizing the mentally ill. This is a continuation of the Stacie J situation. Because of Stacie’s quirky behavior he said, “This comes from two people, Stacie, that don’t like each other at all. The first thing they’ve agreed on is that you’re crazy…Stacie, if you have a problem, I don’t want you running my companies.” This suggests that Trump refuses to hire or continue to employ mentally ill people. This is backed up by his use of ableist terms like “nut job”, “crazy” and “wacko” to demean Jeb Bush, Bernie Sanders, Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, and Elizabeth Warren. He conflates mental illness with crime and said that gun-free zones that gun-free zones are “target practice for the sickos and for the mentally ill.” A man who willingly tears down the mentally ill should not be in charge of a country where 25% of the population is believed to have a mental illness; and at least two-thirds are either unaware of it or are going untreated for it. 141. Painted himself as the hero of NYC in New York Times article in 1983. According to Trump, he alone is responsible for Grand Central being renovated and hotel jobs being saved. 142. Doesn’t like compromise. He told Life magazine in January 1989, “I’m not big on compromise. I understand compromise. Sometimes compromise is the right answer, but oftentimes compromise is the equivalent of defeat, and I don’t like being defeated.” 143. He suggested success/deal-making is genetic; that people who don’t succeed are afraid to or are “life’s losers”. In 1984, he told Lois Romano of the Washington Post, “Some people have an ability to negotiate. It’s an art you’re basically born with. You either have it or you don’t.” In The Art of the Deal, Trump said, “Most people think small, because most people are afraid of success, afraid of making decisions, afraid of winning.” He also said, “One of the problems when you become successful is that jealousy and envy inevitably follow. There are people—I categorize them as life’s losers—who get their sense of accomplishment and achievement from trying to stop others. As far as I’m concerned, if they had any real ability they wouldn’t be fighting me, they’d be doing something constructive themselves.” 144. […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #132-158



Whether or not we openly acknowledge it, voter suppression still goes on in the United States. Nine states passed or introduced legislation that could have infringed upon the rights of citizens in 2013; six did so in 2014. Voter suppression is commonly associated with racism, especially against black people, but it also impacts the elderly, American Indians, students, and people with disabilities. Over thirty states have considered laws that would require voters to present government-issued photo ID to vote and around 11% of Americans do not have that ID, which would place an undue burden on them or would strip them completely of the ability to vote. Other attempts to limit voting include cutting back on early voting and making it harder for people who’ve gone to the wrong precinct to vote.1 Voter suppression is unconstitutional, but some people support it out of fear of voter fraud; it also can gain support because it bills fighting voter fraud can actually sound benign in nature. What do you think can be done to limit or combat voter suppression? Has your state passed any laws that you think might count as voter suppression? Have you personally experienced voter suppression? Do strict voter ID laws need to exist to protect against voter fraud? Or is voter fraud not a significant enough problem to warrant the laws? ACLU: 1, 2, 3 ↩

Daily Debate: Oct. 6, 2015


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Guess who’s back…back again? If you said the Backstreet Boys, you are wrong in so many ways. If you said Dale Jackson, then obviously you’ve been reading my tweets for the past few hours. The man that I have had either blocked or muted for years has once again deemed it necessary to bother me.1 Apparently, people can’t post links to petitions about voter suppression without earning an annoying tweet from the awful and annoying Mr. Jackson. That'll be a very short investigation called for by very stupid people. #alpolitics https://t.co/Vk7ePWzS5h — Dale Jackson (@TheDaleJackson) October 5, 2015 The “conversation” quickly devolved into him calling me stupid2 and wanting me to prove that he’s a racist. 3 I’m pretty sure that his racism could be inferred by anyone who read his tweets or listened to his talk show. I don’t. I try to pretend like the man doesn’t exist. His talk show makes my anxiety levels go up because it seems like he’s constantly yelling. Despite what some people think, anger and rage are not my cup of tea. Anyway, Dale and his followers4 seem to think that voter suppression will not happen as a result of Alabama closing 31 of its driver license offices, leaving only 28, because most people get their licenses using other methods. Well, that’s nice, but it’s still possible and any possible injustice is something that people should be alarmed by.5 They, including Dale,6789 also thought that it was super easy1011 to get a free photo voter ID from the state, which I’m guessing is either from willful ignorance or laziness. Either way, I was amazed at how often they got it wrong. I started to write a tweet out to send to one of them, informing them of their ignorance, but it ended up being extremely long. I realized it was actually almost blog post length, so I thought I’d post it here rather than on Twitter or an app for super-long tweets: If you think you can get a photo voter ID easily in the state of Alabama, you’re wrong. First of all, you can’t get one if you currently have any other form of recognized (at precincts) state-issued photo ID. If your other ID expires tomorrow, you better have someone bring you to the registrar two days from now. And they may try to convince you to get your license renewed, even if you can no longer drive or cannot afford the fee for the non-driver ID. (Paying to procure an ID for the purpose of voting is a violation of laws prohibiting poll taxes.) To get the ID, you have to bring your birth certificate to the registrar. No big deal, right? Except that many people don’t have a copy on hand. If you DON’T have one, you’ll need to get one. And to get one, you have to pay a fee. (This falls under the poll tax classification, but you can challenge getting it for yourself & authorize the registrar to get it from ADPH for free.) Even if you bring every piece of required information with you, there’s no guarantee that they will know what to do with it. I wasn’t the only person who had trouble. Three or four people came in while I waited & got turned away for bs reasons. I almost got turned away for bs reasons & was told I needed to pay for the ID several times before the actual county registrar came in & told them that was unconstitutional. And you may have difficulty finding the registrar office. I’ve seen several people say, “Just go to the courthouse.” (I thought that was where the registrar in my county was, too. It wasn’t. It was miles away & difficult to find.) Now once you have the ID, you may end up having other issues. You know how you use a photo ID at medical appointments? Yeah, they don’t have to use this one. It actually says you can’t use it for non voting purposes. Some offices & hospitals take this seriously, which makes it difficult to get admitted to a clinic/hospital. I know that I’ve already shared this story on Twitter and on here. I’m fairly certain that many of those who were claiming that the IDs were easy to get either won’t read this or, if they read it, they will say that it’s lies or exaggerations or something along those lines. Still, I felt it was necessary to refute their ignorance. Personally, I think that a lot of people who think that the voter suppression isn’t going to happen with the office closures or that the IDs aren’t hard to get are just misinformed.12 They may not mean to be ignorant on an issue, but that doesn’t mean that that ignorance shouldn’t be challenged or called out. But, Dale, if you ever feel the need to contact me again, take this advice: I’m serious. No, really, I am. Go away. Stay away. Buh-bye now. Edited – 10/06/2015 at 11:58 am to change of to if in this sentence: First of all, you can’t get one if you currently have any other form of recognized (at precincts) state-issued photo ID. It seems like every year since 2008 or 2009 he shows up. ↩Get a new line, Dale. ↩Get a new schtick, Dale. ↩Remember my lemmings/sheep comment from before? ↩Surprise, surprise: Injustice isn’t good. It’s actually really bad and we should try to make sure that it never happens. ↩ We know what happened. Budget cuts closed numerous state operations. Every county has a place to get free ID. End. https://t.co/27EOsnSg9h — Dale Jackson (@TheDaleJackson) October 2, 2015  ↩ You do realize, every county has a venue that provides free Voter ID. Which is racism? https://t.co/oCufvStgWS — Dale Jackson (@TheDaleJackson) October 6, 2015  ↩ And the state provides Voter IDs for free in every single county. Please acknowledge you know this. https://t.co/1EO0XfWm56 — Dale Jackson (@TheDaleJackson) October 5, 2015  ↩I did acknowledge it a few times. And I […]

‘Cause It Feels So Empty Without Me



1
Late last week, I rescheduled my appointment with the UAB OB/GYN clinic to get my Depo Provera shot on Tuesday to Thursday afternoon at 2:30.1 I asked that the nature of the appointment also change, since I had done some reading and found out that Depo Provera increases the chance of bone loss. I was told that since I wasn’t dude for an annual visit until October 15 that I would have to make it into a birth control consultation. I said that was fine. On Thursday afternoon, I was in a pretty good mood. I knew that it was possible, if the doctor took too long or there was some unexpected wait going on, I was going to have to stay at the clinic longer than usual because my mom had a dentist appointment, I still felt relatively optimistic. That should have made me nervous, but it didn’t. I was even joking around. 2:16 pm: Craving coffee on the way to a birth control appt while wearing a short strapless dress. Clearly my LDS conversion didn't take. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 That changed after I started signing in. 2:33 pm: Well, that's just great. If you're conservative you probably need to unfollow me right now because I am fucking pissed off. — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 The receptionist started by saying that someone should have gotten in touch with me. She asked if I was on Medicare. I told her I had Humana Medicare and Medicaid. She said that the Business Office had told them that Medicare wouldn’t cover my birth control consultation. I thought that there must have been some misunderstanding. Medicare has never denied a birth control consultation that I’ve been to, including the ones that I went to when my gynecologist was trying to come up with a treatment for the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, but my hormones weren’t taking to the ring or the Seasonale or any of the many hormonal birth control methods that I tried. And I knew that, as a Medicaid patient, there shouldn’t be a rule against birth control access.2 I asked if she could appeal it and she said not today. That might seem like a perfectly reasonable statement for her, but I’m on a clock. Depo shots are only effective for so long. And once the progesterone has gotten out of my system, my dysfunctional uterine bleeding or, more specifically, my menometrorrhagia3 will act up again. I will bleed for days, weeks, or months on end until my iron stores are depleted and my anemia comes back with a vengeance. Birth control is life or death for treatment for me. Even if it weren’t, denying access to it would be wrong. So I started drafting tweet after tweet of how horrifying the situation was. 2:34 pm: I arrived for my #birthcontrol consultation appointment & was told insurance won't cover it. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare (1/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 I get to wait a month until my annual exam. My Depo will wear off in the meantime. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (2/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 I will start bleeding. My anemia will get worse. My overall health will get worse. (3/31) @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 All because there's a magical little rule that says I can't come in before my annual (4/31) @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 exam to switch #birthcontrol methods. A switch I was making because Depo increases risk of bone loss. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare (5/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 As a person with joint issues & a vitamin d def., bone loss isn't something I need. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (6/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 It's ridiculous that I've never run into this rule before. I've taken bc off and on @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (7/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 for 20 years, and half of those have been on #Medicare & #Medicaid. I've had bc consults in that time. @HumanaHelp #birthcontrol (8/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 I asked the receptionist if it could be appealed. She said not today & acted like this @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (9/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 rule was something she'd never heard of, but she also wouldn't get call anyone @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (10/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 from the business office for me to ask. She also claimed they tried to tell me. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (11/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Kinda funny since they didn't call & didn't email. How hard were they *trying*? @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (12/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 So, when did this rule come along? Why is my health allowed to be put in jeopardy? @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (13/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Are other women being forced to go w/o meds? Are they on meds that could hurt them? @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (14/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 How many low income patients are being denied basic healthcare? @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (15/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Believe it or not, not all #birthcontrol is safe or effective for all people who take it. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare (16/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 Patients deserve to be able to find the one that fits their needs. Why deny us that? @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (17/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 They said that to get the prescription, I'd have to pay for a $90 office visit today. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (18/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 IF I HAD $90 TO SPEND ON AN OB/GYN APPOINTMENT, I WOULDN'T BE A PATIENT THERE. @HumanaHelp #medicaid #medicare #birthcontrol (19/31) — Janet Morris (@janersm) September 24, 2015 It's […]

Some Days Even My Lucky Rocketship Underpants Don’t Help