America


If you’re looking for a charity to donate to, I’ve included links to the donation pages of the charities listed under each category. Most of these originally were posted as part of my 2016 holiday wishlist. Abuse and Sexual Assault 1in6 National Coalition Against Domestic Violence RAINN Animal Rights ASPCA Antisemitism ADL Capital Punishment National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty Civil Liberties ACLU Disability Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund Environment/Science Clinton Foundation EarthJustice GreenPeace NRDC Union of Concerned Scientists Human Rights Human Rights Watch USA for UNHCR Women’s Refugee Commission Islamophobia CAIR Journalism ProPublica RSF LGBTQ Human Rights Campaign Lambda Legal SPLC Trevor Project Poverty Alabama Arise Clinton Foundation Racism Black Lives Matter Mexican American Legal Defense Fund NAACP and its Legal Defense Fund SPLC Reproductive Rights/Feminism Center for Reproductive Rights Clinton Foundation EMILY’s List Guttmacher NARAL National Abortion Federation National Organization for Women Planned Parenthood She Should Run Women’s Refugee Commission If you have any suggestions for this list, please let me know.

Charitable Shortcuts


For people who have known me since childhood, this isn’t an unsurprising revelation. It was when I first told them. My friends would always ask me why and it was difficult to explain. It wasn’t a religious thing. It wasn’t that I hated Halloween — I will always love Halloween. It was more a habit born out of a lack of safety in the neighborhood I had once lived in. Before I was 8 years old, I lived in a rather unsafe neighborhood. Gang fights on my corner were not unusual. If I was out after dark in our neighborhood, both of my parents were with me. My dad wasn’t typically home early enough to go trick-or-treating, and my mom did not feel comfortable taking me out without him. So we gave out candy to the few kids who decided to brave it. Usually, we were done by about 7 because it just wasn’t a big deal in that neighborhood. Right after my 8th birthday, my parents and I moved into the house with my grandfather. He lived in a safer neighborhood, so it would have been fine for me to go — I could have even gone without my mom. But I didn’t. I handed out candy. All of my friends who lived in my neighborhood seemed to come by my house, and I got to see all of their costumes. It was pretty awesome. I never felt like I was missing out on the fun. If we had candy left over at the end of the night, I could pilfer it. (We typically didn’t.) The only time I really went out trick-or-treating, I went as a chaperone for my foster sister. I was fifteen and she was twelve. We only walked down our street, but it was fun. I still didn’t get candy — since I wasn’t really going out for that. I did get some money from one of the neighbors. Instead of candy, he was giving out coins for people who could correctly answer math problems. I had always been in advanced math classes and was in Algebra II that fall, so racking up money was pretty easy. Regardless of where we lived, I dressed up every year until middle school and once as an adult at a church dance. One year I was a purple bunny. Another I was a ballerina. I dressed up in an antebellum-style dress the year that I discovered the movie Gone with the Wind. I even dressed up as a clown one year. My favorite costume was when I dressed up as Maleficent, my favorite character from Sleeping Beauty — actually, she’s my favorite from any Disney movie. My mom made my costumes and didn’t seem to mind that I always wanted to dress up in fun styles, even if I didn’t go out asking for candy. I’ve attended events that were Halloween-themed, as a child and as an adult. I’ve been to haunted houses and mazes, which weren’t all that thrilling. (I don’t get scared when watching thrillers and horror films, so that makes sense.) I’ve gone to autumn festivals at school. When I was 8, I had a Halloween party and three or four friends came over. It was actually the day after Halloween, which made getting food and stuff a lot easier. (Yay, post-holiday candy sales!) We had a cookie cake and used toilet paper to turn each other into mummies — you know, without the wire hanger up the nose and the organ preservation. (Yeah, I went there.) Being the day after also meant that we didn’t dress up for the party, which was probably a good thing since it was a rainy day and everyone had walked over. When I was 24, I went to a Halloween Young Single Adults (YSA) dance with other 18–30 year-old members of the LDS church in my region. I dressed up as a hippie that night and won the costume contest. I also lost one of my favorite earrings in the world on the side of I-65 that night, so there were good times and bad ones. I didn’t enjoy the good as much as I should have because I had already had a bad month — one week earlier, my friend’s car caught fire when I was in it, then I sprained my ankle later that night — so losing my earrings just added, for lack of a better phrase, fuel to that fire. RIP beloved earrings. Anyway, I digress. I know that for people who aren’t from the United States that missing out on something like trick-or-treating might seem like it isn’t that big of a deal, but it sort of is. It’s a part of our culture, especially if you’ve been privileged enough to grow up in a place where it is safe to go out. So not having that experience did sometimes make me feel like an outsider, but I didn’t really feel safe enough to have that experience — even when it actually was safe. It’s weird that I do sort of regret not having the experience. But I’m also okay with not having it. I guess that’s one of those complicated things about being an adult — coming to terms with the stuff that you experienced or didn’t experience when you were younger. But I hope that if I have kids some day that I get to take them out trick-or-treating or, at least, let them dress up like their favorite characters because I think that getting that night of fun and make-believe is really important. Happy Halloween.

I Never Went Trick-Or-Treating As a Kid



After watching Audrie & Daisy, I seriously hope that Darren White loses his bid to be reelected. I know documentaries don’t always give you the full picture, but it’s clear that he doesn’t respect rape & sexual assault victims. This is one Democratic candidate I would never vote for, and a race where I’m actually hopeful the Republican wins. His bias was clear. Daisy Coleman deserved more from his department. He failed her. He failed the people of Nodaway County, and the bullying & vandalism that took place after her rape is proof that he is also unable to keep the peace in his community. He does not deserve to be a law enforcement officer anymore. Unfortunately, I don’t believe he will lose. If the people of Nodaway County and Maryville can be so hateful toward a rape victim based upon who raped her, then they might not even care about the miscarriage of justice by Darren White. Maybe they’ll prove me wrong and elect Randy Strong. I hope they do.

I Hope the Nodaway County Sheriff Loses


Local news showed a story about the Madison County GOP’s pre-Presidential election meeting. At the very end of it, one of the speakers can be heard saying that he wants to “whip” Hillary Clinton. It may have been an innocent comment, but it’s still odd to say you want to physically accost the opposing candidate. That’s especially true when the candidate is a woman and in a culture that one beat women into submission–and not for kinky fun times.

Madison County GOP wants to whip Hillary Clinton



Just a few more reasons to oppose the Talking Piece of Candy Corn Trump.   172. Didn’t correct audience member who called Obama Muslim before ranting about Muslims. Right after an audience member stated, “We have a problem in this country. It’s called Muslims. You know our current president is one. You know he’s not even an American.”, Trump said, “We need this question. This is the first question.” The audience member went on to ask, “When can we get rid of them?” Instead of correcting the audience member on both the ethnic cleansing idea and the Obama’s religion and nationality, Trump gave a vague answer about how he would look at and do plenty of things. After receiving a lot of backlash, Trump said he wasn’t “morally obligated” to defend Obama. Okay. How about being morally obligated to say that ethnic cleansing is awful? How about that? 173. Tweets sound like an adolescent. If you haven’t noticed, you haven’t been paying attention. It’s even become a joke. 174. Would shut borders on Day 1. During a Twitter question and answer session in September 2015, Trump said, “The first thing I’d do in my first day as president is close up our borders so that illegal immigrants cannot come into our country.” This was before his “total and complete shutdown” of borders to Muslims proposal after San Bernardino and the renewed call after Brussels. 175. “Why aren’t we letting ISIS go and fight Assad and then we pick up the remnants?” On 60 Minutes Scott Pelley: We’re at war with ISIS as we sit here. How do you end it? Donald Trump: I would end ISIS forcefully. I think ISIS, what they did, was unbelievable what they did with James Foley and with the cutting off of heads of everybody, I mean these people are totally a disaster. Now, let me just say this, ISIS in Syria, Assad in Syria, Assad and ISIS are mortal enemies. We go in to fight ISIS. Why aren’t we letting ISIS go and fight Assad and then we pick up the remnants? Why are we doing this? We’re fighting ISIS and Assad has to be saying to himself, “They have the nicest or dumbest people that I’ve ever imagined.” Scott Pelley: Let me get this right, so we lay off ISIS for now? Donald Trump: Excuse me, let — Scott Pelley: Lay off in Syria, let them destroy Assad. And then we go in behind that? Donald Trump: –that’s what I would say. Yes, that’s what I would say. Then… Donald Trump: If you look at Syria. Russia wants to get rid of ISIS. We want to get rid of ISIS. Maybe let Russia do it. Let ’em get rid of ISIS. What the hell do we care? Scott Pelley: OK, that’s Syria. What do you–do in Iraq– Donald Trump: With that– Scott Pelley: –with ISIS? Donald Trump: Look with ISIS in Iraq, you gotta knock ’em out. You gotta knock ’em out. You gotta fight ’em. You gotta fight ’em. You have to stand– Scott Pelley: On the ground? Donald Trump: –if you need, you’re going to have to do that, yes. Scott Pelley: Troops on the ground. Donald Trump: Yes. 176. Says Muslims believe America should be governed by shariah. Trump cited a highly flawed poll that found that 51% of American Muslims should have the choice of being governed according to shariah. That poll had come from an organization known for dubious claims and studies about the threat of shariah and used unreliable methodology. Trump used the poll’s findings to base his ban on Muslims entering the United States. Trump has also allied with individuals like Roger Stone, who accused Khizr Khan of wanting to initiate shariah and oppress women & gays, and kill Christians. If elected, Trump would be the first Facebook meme to be elected President of the United States. 177. “We have places in London and other places that are so radicalised that the police are afraid for their own lives. We have to be very smart and very vigilant.” London’s Metropolitan police responded, “We would not normally dignify such comments with a response, however, on this occasion we think it’s important to state to Londoners that Mr Trump could not be more wrong.” The Met thought that Trump’s claim was also potentially damaging, and Downing Street also criticized his message. Even Boris Johnson, who is basically a British Trump, thought the comments were “complete and utter nonsense” and remarked that “crime has been falling steadily both in London and in New York–the only reason I wouldn’t go to some parts of New York is the real risk of meeting Donald Trump.” Apparently British Trump occasionally has better sense than Donald Trump. 178. Did not say anything about Jo Cox’s death, but comments every time a story of murder linked to Muslim extremists breaks. When Jo Cox was assassinated by a man yelling “Britain first” who had supported far-right groups with similar ideologies to Trump, Trump said nothing. When fans of his celebrated her death, he said nothing. She’s been dead for over a month and he still hasn’t commented. But whenever there’s even a slight possibility that a crime has been committed by someone he thinks is Muslim, he’s won’t stop talking about it. Gee. I wonder if he’s only seeing one group as actual terrorists. What would he do if far-right terrorists here attacked left-wing advocates & politicians? 179. Called Libya Hillary’s baby, and wasn’t referring to Benghazi. On Face the Nation in January, Trump said, “She has caused death. She has caused tremendous death with incompetent decisions. I was against the war in Iraq. I wasn’t a politician, but I was against the war in Iraq. She voted for the war in Iraq…Look at Libya. That was her baby. Look. I mean, I’m not even talking about the ambassador and the people with the ambassador.” I wish someone would explain to him that his opinions on Libya don’t matter, especially since […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #172-184


Sorry that I fell behind by a few days. I had some stuff come up in my family that took precedence. I have decided that splitting each list up into 21 items is a bit too anal of me. I’ll get as many done in a day as I can. That may mean huge lists some days and really small ones on other days. I have a feeling that if you’re looking for reasons to oppose Donald Trump, no list can be too big or too small.1 I’m also going to begin posting each reason on my Twitter account under #2016Reasons. I’ve already been posting each of these posts to that hashtag. 106. Trump said that you never see thin people drinking Diet Coke. Despite the fact that he drinks the soda, Trump enjoys fat-shaming people who drink the soda. I guess that it’s a case of do as I say, not as I do, also known as typical Donald Trump. 107. Donald Trump talks about women like they’re his property. You should know by now that I’m not joking when I say things like this, so yes, he really uses possessive language about women. Specifically, he said, “I think the only difference between me and the other candidates is that I’m more honest and my women are more beautiful.” And if you’re thinking, “well, at least it’s a compliment,” then I’m going to assume that you’re probably going to vote Republican anyway. People cannot be owned. Now, I know that Trump has a history of trying to get around that by “employing” people who are in forced servitude (slavery) to build things for him, but the statement stands. 108. He thinks he can brag about humility. When Lesley Stahl interviewed him for 60 Minutes after he announced that Pence would be his running mate, he said this about himself: “I think I’m much more humble than you would understand.” And it wasn’t the only time he felt the need to brag about how humble he is. He once even compared his humility to that of the Pope. Donald, Donald, Donald. Do you not understand how humility works? It’s not something that you can brag about. Well, obviously, you can brag about anything, but if you’re bragging about being humble, then you are not humble. Know why? It’s what the word means: Humility: a modest or low view of one’s own importance; humbleness. Bragging about humility is a bit like fat-shaming people for drinking Diet Coke while guzzling a tiny little bottle of Diet Coke on board a private plane. Yeah, I said it. 109. “The point is, you can never be too greedy.” I shouldn’t be surprised that Donald subscribes to the Gordon Gekko philosophy of wealth acquisition. Maybe, like many, he doesn’t understand that Gekko wasn’t the hero of those movies. He was the villain. Perhaps, he was inspired by the Ferengi in the Star Trek universe; failing to recognize that they too were meant to be antagonists. Or maybe it’s due to growing up in a wealthy family; he never learned that life isn’t about being the wealthiest person in the room or becoming the wealthiest person in the room. He values his bank balance more than he values lives. Is that the kind of person that you want running the United States? 110. Political events are about ratings for him. Whether talking about the debates or the Republican National Convention, Donald Trump obsessed over how many people were watching. I hate to break it to him, but a lot of people who watched those things aren’t even voting for him. At a certain point, watching Trump speak became more about either laughing at him or trying to determine just how out there the man is. But even if people were watching to root him on in his fight against the establishment–aka himself–believing that ratings are the most important part of the events proves how out of touch he is with the importance of the job he’s campaigning to have. Debates and conventions are not just job interviews, they’re part of national conversations where we all start determining where exactly this country should stand on a variety of important issues. Since Trump doesn’t even bother to share his plans for working on those issues, it’s clear that he doesn’t even get the most basic part about it. When he only speaks in incoherent soundbites, it’s easy to see how shallow the man and the campaign really are. 111. He’s opposed to marriage equality. Donald likes to paint himself as a pro-LGBTQ candidate, but he believes in “traditional” marriage. (Apparently, traditional marriage means a union of one man, three women, and a lot of divorce attorneys.) Electing Donald Trump could jeopardize the rights that so many people have fought so hard to win and could prevent future wins in other ongoing fights for equality in America. He has vowed to overturn the decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. 112. Patronized a woman claiming to be a 9/11 survivor. Trump called Alicia Watkins “sweetie” before giving her a “job interview” and saying he’d hire her because he had a gut feeling about her. Watkins told him that she was a 9/11 survivor and a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Watkins has since been described as having falsified her record and having violated federal laws against Stolen Valor by wearing a purple heart that she didn’t earn. Not only did he patronize her, he proved that his gut kinda sucks. 113. Threatened to “spill the beans” on Heidi Cruz. During the end of the Republican primaries, things between Ted Cruz and Donald Trump got a bit heated. In a move that Cruz still won’t forgive Trump for, Trump threatened Heidi on Twitter. He followed it up by retweeting an unflattering picture of Heidi–a move he actually regrets. 114. Called 9/11 “7/11”. During a rally, Donald Trump confused a huge national tragedy with the real life inspiration for the Kwik-E-Mart. For any American, that would be a big flub, but for someone who loves to brag about his patriotism […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #106-131



Wow, @realDonaldTrump thinks we Muslim women aren't allowed to speak, let's let him hear us in Nov., in honor of Mrs.Khan✊🏼#TrumpSacrifices — Cirrincione (@NoorinDC) July 30, 2016 7 Memorable Controversies Involving Miss USA, Miss Universe and Miss Teen USA Pageants and Winners https://t.co/0qZamIgQu6 #TrumpSacrifices — CandaceTX (@CandaceTX) July 30, 2016 His credit rating with American banks. They won't do business with him. #TrumpSacrifices — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 #TrumpSacrifices Not sleeping with his daughter. —1) (@Sttbs73) July 30, 2016 He had to give up the abusive Corey Lewandowski for the Putin puppet Paul Manafort. Woe is him. Such a sacrifice! #TrumpSacrifices — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 I can't think of a more disrespectful gesture. #TrumpSacrifices his entire soul. http://pic.twitter.com/CSmOnErOy2 — Jesse T. Smith (@jt4congress2016) July 30, 2016 Captain Khan and his family represent the best of America, and we salute them. http://pic.twitter.com/MGeJXPF2DE — Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) July 30, 2016 Photo credit: Disney | ABC Television Group via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-ND (Political Nerd ↩

.@realDonaldTrump It was on CNN yesterday that there was a two million viewer difference. I bet most of those were people hate-watching. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump It aired before your press conference where you accused CNN of lying about you before proceeding to lie about them turning — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump their camera off. It was during @BrookeBCNN's coverage. https://t.co/zOsSnY2hhs — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 @janersm @realDonaldTrump the other interesting thing is where people are watching. Republican base is older, watching on broadcast tv — apocalypse meow (@bEx_x3d) July 30, 2016 @janersm @realDonaldTrump there's not a great way to measure online viewership due to decentralized nature — apocalypse meow (@bEx_x3d) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump Actually, he didn't explicitly agree with you. He voiced a similar opinion, though not with the isolationist rhetoric. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump You're upset that she's telling people there about how you outsource your labor, aren't you? — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump You do have small crowds. Many of the events that you claimed were overflowing with people were half-empty. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump You mean the private event? 200 people at a private event in a town with 20k isn't bad. It's 1% of the population. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 .@realDonaldTrump You had what at your (public) event in Colorado Springs? Less than 3000 in a city where over 430k people live. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 @grimalkinrn Makes sense. When he spoke here, he used a HS stadium in the middle of nowhere instead of a downtown arena. @realDonaldTrump — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 30, 2016 @janersm Yeah, he’s terrified of protesters and Denver has some really lovely folks and good organization. @realDonaldTrump — Lilith (@grimalkinrn) July 30, 2016 Photo credit: DonkeyHotey via VisualHunt / CC BY-SA


Surprising no one, Donald Trump Jr. is a-okay with the confederate flag, doesn’t get the ‘nonsense’ surrounding it. https://t.co/HUOiprNc3h — American Bridge (@American_Bridge) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr I’m southern and my family has been in America since the 17th Century. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr My family, unlike yours, fought in the Civil War. On both sides. One was captured at Gettysburg, so I'm going to — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr quickly school you on the flag and the war. The confederate flag represents support of slavery & denigrating people — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr on the basis of race. It also stands for hatred of and rebellion against the United States. If you find that flag to be — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr worthy of display, you are supporting a disregard of freedom, of humanity, and a disdain for this country, for its values. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr You aren’t saying you want this country to be great. You’re saying you don’t want it to exist at all. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 .@DonaldJTrumpJr The CSA’s leaders hated that flag after the war because they knew what it stood for, something you clearly do not get. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 I don’t have time for confederate flag apologists. — Janet Morris (@janersm) July 29, 2016 I’m really starting to wonder about the quality of private school education. I am definitely worried about the Trump campaign’s and the Trump family’s desire to dog-whistle racists. Of course, it might not be that much of a dog-whistle since Trump Spawn #1 also seems to be into InfoWars and Alex Jones. Something is definitely off if he’s into that. Photo credit: Disney | ABC Television Group via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-ND

Only four posts in and I’ve already touched a nerve. @janersm which literally most people do on a regular basis. And the fact you’re writing a 2500 essay on the wrongs of trump is biast — StopRaven (@stop_raven) July 26, 2016 It’s “biast” for me to express my own opinion. Oh my goodness. How dare someone have an actual opinion! So, if you didn’t read my first, second, or third set of 21 reasons to oppose Trump, consider reading those before you read the next 21 reasons. After today’s post, there will be 95 more posts. If they were bottles of beer, this could be a song. 64. Donald Trump lied about witnessing Muslims celebrating 9/11 on a rooftop in Jersey City, New Jersey. I’ve mentioned Trump’s mocking of Serge Kovaleski, but not how he earned the ire of Trump. Kovaleski had covered a story in 2001 that suggested that there were people in Jersey City partying on rooftops. Donald claimed to see thousands of Muslims in New Jersey celebrating on rooftops after the World Trade Centers collapsed. He claimed there was video of it on television all the time. When he was asked about it by George Stephanopolous, Trump said: “It was well covered at the time, George. Now, I know they don’t like to talk about it, but it was well covered at the time. There were people over in New Jersey that were watching it, a heavy Arab population, that were cheering as the buildings came down. Not good.” Except it wasn’t, because it didn’t happen. The story was never about thousands of Muslims. There was no video. It’s all in Trump’s head. 65. Trump insulted Seventh-Day Adventists. While speaking to supporters at a campaign rally in Jacksonville, Florida in October 2015, Trump, after talking about how he’s a Presbyterian, said, “Boy, that’s down the middle of the road folks, in all fairness. I mean, Seventh-day Adventist, I don’t know about. I just don’t know about.” While Trump’s dig may not sound that vicious, it was meant to be very vicious. You seem, some Christians don’t believe that Seventh-day Adventists are even Christian. This is a group that also refuses to vote for non-Christians. This was a time when Trump was behind Ben Carson by 9 percentage points; Carson is a Seventh-day Adventist. It was personal. 66. Trump hired Manafort. When Donald Trump dumped Corey Lewandowski and replaced him with Paul Manafort, very few people in America knew of the background of Manafort. Most stories touted him as having ties to the Republican Party. A few brought up some recent jobs of of his. Manafort has ties to Viktor Yanukovych, who was the the prime minister of the Ukraine at the time, as well as an ally of Vladimir Putin. In 2010, Yanukovych became the president of Ukraine, but had to flee to Russia during the 2014 revolution. Manafort was also a consultant of Yanukovych, helping Yanukovych’s first run for the Ukrainian presidency in 2004. When Yanukovych hired him after the first results were invalidated, Manafort was meant to improve his images. He was unable to in the time given, but Manafort continued to work within Yanukovych’s Party of Regions. Manafort was still working with the administration when Yanukovych fled and continued working within Ukrainian politics after he’d fled, including his reported involvement in the 2015 election campaign of Vitali Klitschko, who ran for mayor in Kiev. Now, Manafort is working with Donald Trump and was even used on July 27th on CBS This Morning to argue that Donald Trump had no ties to Vladimir Putin’s regime, which may have ties to the hacking of the DNC by Russians and subsequent Wikileaks email release. 67. Trump called Hillary Clinton “shrill” at a rally. A lot of people don’t like Hillary Clinton, but most don’t call her “shrill” at campaign events. Actually, he didn’t just say it once, he said it twice–over-pronouncing it the second time. I guess he wanted to make sure that everyone at his half-empty rally heard him correctly. He tried to suggest he calls men shrill, but if he has, it hasn’t been on Twitter. And he should know that the term “shrill” is meant to shut women up. My guess is: that’s why he said it. Luckily, it didn’t work. 68. Trump mocked Fiorina’s physical appearance. No, really. He did and managed to do it while being interviewed by Rolling Stone. When the anchor throws to Carly Fiorina for her reaction to Trump’s momentum, Trump’s expression sours in schoolboy disgust as the camera bores in on Fiorina. “Look at that face!” he cries. “Would anyone vote for that? Can you imagine that, the face of our next president?!” The laughter grows halting and faint behind him. “I mean, she’s a woman, and I’m not s’posedta say bad things, but really, folks, come on. Are we serious?” When asked on Fox News if he really said something like that, he confirmed, saying, “Probably I did say something like that about Carly.” But he tried to walk it back with, “I’m talking about persona. I’m not talking about look.” Donald always has an excuse. 69. Donald Trump believes that John McCain shouldn’t be considered a war hero. While speaking at the Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa, Trump said of McCain, “He’s not a war hero. He was a war hero because he was captured.” 70. Donald Trump also stated that he doesn’t believe that people who are captured are war heroes. In his words, “I like people who weren’t captured.” He’s walked those comments back, because they didn’t go over very well, but they were still said. And his reframing of his comments (“If somebody’s a prisoner, I consider them a war hero.” and “If a person is captured, they’re a hero as far as I’m concerned. … But you have to do other things also.”) didn’t really explain the difference between McCain’s capture and the POWs who he actually sees as a war hero. 71. Trump comes up with childish and […]

2016 Reasons to Oppose Trump: Reasons #64-84