Sticks, Stones, and Unbroken Bones

A lovely opinion by someone identifying as Priscila that I encountered while reading the Buzzfeed story on Project Harpoon:1

Fat people will be like “yeah is my thyrode or my genes”. No sweety, is you not doing excersise or eating your veggies

So much denial here.

EDIT: For starters, when you are fat you are not healty because if you fall your own weight will break a bone that normally wont if you are skinnier.

And my response:

I’ve always been obese and I’ve fallen a lot in my life. None of those falls resulted in a fracture. That’s even with a pretty severe vitamin D deficiency and with connective tissue diseases (Ehlers-Danlos & UCTD) which cause more fragile bones. God, even PCOS, which I also have and was diagnosed by a specialist, can lead to fragile bones, but, big shocker, no fractures while falling for me.
The only breaks I’ve ever had were when I was 13, 14, and 16. That was one stress fracture that just took a long time to heal, which would have been true even if I had grown up at a healthy weight. (People with EDS have a harder time healing from injuries.)
And to the people who bring up the high blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, etc. stuff: Yes, obese people can develop those things, but not every obese person does. I have low blood pressure. I have normal blood sugar. I have some cholesterol issues, but I’ve been working on that without medication and it’s been improving. If you saw me, you wouldn’t know that I eat an extremely low sodium diet and only take in, at most, 1500 calories. You wouldn’t know that the only things I drink every day are water (64-96 oz./day) and milk (8 oz./day). You wouldn’t know that I really hate fast food. You wouldn’t know that when I can exercise regularly (I have an ongoing EDS-related knee injury that’s got that sidelined for now) that I walk 2 miles a day (split into a mile or less per session per doctor’s orders) or that when I can’t, I’m still getting in more steps in a day than my more able-bodied friends. And you wouldn’t know that because when you look at me, all you see is the fat. You don’t see the person. So your “concern” over my health or over the health of other people who look like I do really seems fake.

My mom’s obese2 and breaks bones every year, but it isn’t the obesity that causes the breaks. It’s the combination of connective tissue disease and a vitamin d deficiency. My 82-year old grandmother is obese, falls down quite a bit, and doesn’t break bones.345 Being obese and falling doesn’t mean someone is going to break a bone. Weight problems and falling down aren’t uncommon in my family, but fracturing a bone with every fall is.

And guess what?!

Even with the obesity and obesity-related issues, a lot of my relatives have lived until they’re in their 80’s and 90’s. Lifespan isn’t determined by weight alone or with the issues related to it. Maybe the non-experts on the internet should lay off the medical advice.6

  1. Under this comment

  2. Yes, she’s also diabetic, has high blood pressure, has had issues with cholesterol, and has kidney failure, so on that she hit the fat person quadfecta. 

  3. She also doesn’t have issues with her sugar. 

  4. Her blood pressure being high is a relatively new thing. 

  5. I’m not sure about her cholesterol. 

  6. And the experts should know better than to give medical advice without a proper history. 

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Janet Morris

I'm from Huntsville, Alabama. I've got as many college credits as a doctorate candidate, and the GPA of some of them, too. I have a boss by the name of Amy Pond. She's a dachshund. My parents both grew up in Alabama.

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