Banished Words List 2011: EPIC

More than one nominator says the use of ‘epic’ has become an epic annoyance.

“Cecil B. DeMille movies are epic. Internet fallouts and opinions delivered in caps-lock are not. ‘Epic fail,’ ‘epic win’, ‘epic (noun)’ — it doesn’t matter; it needs to be banished until people recognize that echoing trite, hyperbolic Internet phrases in an effort to look witty or intelligent actually achieves the opposite.” Kim U., Des Moines, Iowa.

“Over-use of the word ‘epic’ has reached epic proportions. Tim Blaney, Snoqualmie, Wash.

“Anything that this word describes in popular over-usage is rarely ever ‘epic’ in the traditional sense of being heroic, majestic, or just plain awe-inspiring.” Mel F., Dallas, Tex.

“Standards for using ‘epic’ are so low, even ‘awesome’ is embarrassed.” Mike of Kettering, Ohio.

“I’m sure that when the history books are written or updated and stories have been passed through the generations, the epic powder on the slopes during your last ski trip or your participation in last night’s epic flash mob will probably not be included. This may be the root of this epic problem, but it seems as if during the past two years, any idea that was not successful was considered an ‘epic-fail.’ This includes the PowerPoint presentation you tried to give during this morning’s meeting, but couldn’t because of technical problems. Also, the ice storm of ‘epic proportions’ that is blanketing the east coast this winter sure looks a lot like the storm that happened last winter.” DV, Seattle, Wash.

From Lake Superior State University

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Janet Morris

I'm from Huntsville, Alabama. I've got as many college credits as a doctorate candidate, and the GPA of some of them, too. I have a boss by the name of Amy Pond. She's a dachshund. My parents both grew up in Alabama.