*le sigh*

My Thanksgiving has sucked. Actually, my week has pretty much sucked. The movie was great, but so much happened in the hours following the movie. My grandmother called and had developed pneumonia, so I stayed with her for a night to make sure she was okay. Then, my mom stayed with her the next two nights. I developed something like bronchitis, which got worse the more stressed I got. My mom’s health started to get worse, but I kept passing it off as her just being annoying. (I know it’s bad to do that, but sometimes I don’t get that she can be in so much more pain when we have virtually the same things wrong with us.) I stayed up cooking all night last night for today, and I was psyched. Then, my dad was all moody when he woke up because I’d left the TV on too loud when I was finished cooking and was just reading. Then, my mom, dad, and I went to my grandmother’s house for Thanksgiving like usual, only once we got there things took an unusual turn. She was fine for a while, then she got pale and started having trouble breathing and having trouble stopping this whole body twitching thing. It was scary, in a way, because I kept thinking that she was going to die before the ambulance got there. (My grandmother lives in the middle of nowhere practically, so it wasn’t like I didn’t have a reason to fear.) I wasn’t panicking, though. I stayed very calm. I tried to help the medics with as much information as possible. I didn’t start crying until she was in the ambulance and my dad was talking to her before they left. I was all by myself in the car, which, as you know, leads to badness. I was thinking of contingency plans. What did I do if my mom didn’t make it while in transport from my grandmother’s house to the hospital in Huntsville? I would survive, I finally determined, but I wasn’t sure what would be left of me. I mean, when you take into consideration that anyone who has ever seen the interaction between my mom and me has said that it’s like watching two people sharing one mind, it is important to realize that we feel like one person sometimes. Whatever hurts one, hurts the other. We don’t let each other do anything risky for fear the consequences not only to that person, but to ourselves. We’re very careful, which can lead to resentment, but it’s a resentment that we understand. Anyway, back to the whole this week’s suckage, we got to Huntsville after winding down some country roads pretty fast and my mom was told that her blood sugar had dropped to like 37. (The low end of normal is 70.) She was given some sugar and things started to get better. They had to give her a breathing treatment, which I figure is why her blood sugar started bottoming out again, partially. (If you’ve never had asthma medicine, let me tell you, it drains your body of every resource.) It hit 48 after it had gone up briefly. They gave her more sugar. She sent me home. I stayed at home, fielding calls from my grandmother every hour and a half. My mom was admitted to the hospital. My dad told me at 7:00 that he was about to come home. I started panicking around 8:10 when he wasn’t here. I thought that he should have been here at least 40 minutes earlier. I don’t like being alone in the dark, especially in an already tense situation. So he got here at about 8:30, and instead of berating him for not being here on time, I just let it slide. I felt like if I got mad at him, then I would be punished somehow for being a bad daughter and that I would end up with both parents in the hospital or worse. (Crazy, I know, but that’s how my brain works.)

I’m extremely tense right now, so I made a deal with my dad that I get to spend tomorrow at the movie theater. He asked me what I was going to see. That should have been an easy guess. I’m a dork, therefore what movie am I going to go see? Twilight, of course. Not once, but twice. There shouldn’t be too many teenage girls at the first showing, since it’s at 12:20 in the afternoon. I mean, most teens don’t go to matinees, even when school is out. (Always try to get the matinee, if you’re planning on booking seats to a popular movie.) It will probably be busier at 3:20 when the second showing starts.

I was planning on seeing the movie again, anyway, but I needed to pick something that I could just lose myself in. I’m pretty good at doing that when it comes to the whole Edward and Bella thing. I think when I come home, I may start reading the books again. I just finished them again this morning, but to me, they’re like comfort food. Since I haven’t been eating much at all since I went on the Metformin, I might have to take comfort in reading certain books instead of indulging in things that will cause my sugar to do what my mom’s has been doing…shooting up and plummeting.

I’m almost over my hypoglycemic thing that’s been going on today, as well. My mom and I both did the stupid thing this morning of taking our “sugar medicine” with candy, instead of real food. (If you can trick the drug into thinking that you’ve just taken in sugar, then you don’t have to eat as much, therefore leaving the pouch open for more food…which is a good thing on Thanksgiving.) It backfired on both of us, her more than me. My hypoglycemia kicked in and has been kicking my butt all day long. I finally had a meal at about 3 at the hospital, then some more real food at about 5:30 because my body had already gotten over the minor sugar rush that I had gotten from the real food I had eaten shortly before that. I had to eat a little more real food at 7. Then, I just grabbed a bottle of G2 and started swigging back the sugar in the form of light Gatorade. It seemed to even out my sugar, to where I was able to deal with it for a while while I waited on my dad to get home. Once he got home, my mood stabilized and so did my sugar. I haven’t been hungry the whole time he’s been home. Yay for small miracles.

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Janet Morris

I'm from Huntsville, Alabama. I've got as many college credits as a doctorate candidate, and the GPA of some of them, too. I have a boss by the name of Amy Pond. She's a dachshund. My parents both grew up in Alabama.

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